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36 results for East Carolina University
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Record #:
36068
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East Carolina University’s development could be perceived through on-campus involvement options. Campus life in the 1920s and 1930s may be viewed as an illustrious illustration. The three literary-minded societies were Edgar Allan Poe, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and Sydney Lanier. As for the Jarvis Society, it was established for the few male students on campus.
Record #:
36069
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For this second generation ECU alumna, the snowstorm of 1943 could have been something worth writing home about. Noteworthy items in this present day reflection included the shortage of male students and rationed items on campus during World War II. Meeting the professed love of her life that day, though, alone would have made it significant and special.
Record #:
36072
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East Carolina University: known for its Latin verb derived motto and teacher’s training school roots. From it are expectations for ECU to keep living up to the century-old traditions. Helping to keep the promises of education and service were off-campus facilities, the Building Hope Community Life Center and Lucille Gorham Intergenerational Center, and on-campus Volunteer and Service Learning Center.
Record #:
36076
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Among East Carolina Teacher’s Training School’s collection of historically famous facts was the source of the first spring break. Despite modern technology’s absence, the first president’s promise to have the college re-opened in ten days was kept. For this article, the promise kept was also illustrated in pictures. Accompanied photos chronicled the rebuilding of the current Old Cafeteria Building and former Refectory between April 2nd-12th, 1915.
Record #:
36077
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ECU student teachers perhaps can relate to the common concerns cited by this ECTTS student teacher. January 6, 1920 at Greenville’s Joyner School included the day starting with a bell and activities like recess and dinner. Concerns more timely than timeless included games like Sling the Biscuit, a car starting up with a crank, and speeding defined as driving at five miles an hour.
Record #:
36075
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Mentioned were the ten teachers hired by the first president of what was East Carolina Teachers’ Training School. In the accompanied photo were those with past and present buildings at ECU named for them: William H. Ragsdale, Maria D. Graham, Mamie E. Jenkins, Herbert E. Austin, Sallie Joyner Davis, and Claude W. Wilson. The other four featured in the reprinted first photo included Kate W. Lewis, Birdie McKinney, Jennie M. Ogden, and Fannie Bishop.
Record #:
36078
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Facts hinting the excitement over the inaugural class’ arrival on October 5, 1909 were an incomplete auditorium and borrowed pews serving as the first desks. Time-bound facts were kerosene lamps as the light source and number of incoming students, totaling 123 and including 104 women and 19 men. As for timeless facts, included was reprinted text from the first president’s speech, given a month later. His speech reflected the hope and promise he perceived.
Record #:
36080
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For ECU’s Generation Y students, reality TV truly hit home. The Loft was filmed in a local condo and featured other students. While targeting people who came of age in the Internet age, it discussed age-old roommate issues associated with the pleasures of first-time adult freedom and challenges of first-time adult responsibility.
Record #:
36073
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Steven Powell taught his students that just as crucial was caring about improving the quality of life as well as the number of years in a life. Another valuable lesson he instilled: be a positive influence on campus and off, donning the surgical mask and not.
Record #:
36074
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Reprinted was Clarissa Humphrey’s November 17, 1941 Pieces of Eight article. She described the then current First Lady and author of daily “My Day” newspaper column’s visit. Also reprinted was her article’s accompanied photo of Roosevelt and a local Girl Scouts troop on the Dail House steps. Included was the “My Day” article written by Roosevelt the day after her visit.
Record #:
36079
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The YWCA, constructed in 1925, was known for many firsts, in its purposes for the students of East Carolina Teachers’ College. It was the first student group on campus; first student government; first student store. As for its last building, the Y Hut, that served as the student center until it was cleared to make way for the construction of Joyner Library.
Record #:
36085
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Alluding to an article in an earlier edition about Kate Beckwith, the author discusses his mother who he believed was influenced by East Carolina Teachers Training School’s first principal. In reference to his mother’s teaching career, he noted North Carolina’s contribution to the well-known schoolteacher stereotype. According to him, female teachers could not be married.
Record #:
36081
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Among ECU’s accomplishments can be added Aramark and the Volunteer and Service Learning Center’s collaborative creation of Campus Kitchen. It was the first among institutions in the UNC system. As for other ECU students’ food-related endeavors, mentioned was their packing of care packages for military members serving overseas.
Record #:
36088
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Abstract:
The arrival of East Carolina Teachers Training School also started the redirection of Greenville’s spread in 1910. Within four years, the former trend—moving west from Five Points—had shifted to the east, towards what became known as the main campus.
Record #:
36086
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Among the firsts that ECU may claim: offering online proctoring for students from all sixteen higher education institutions in the UNC system. Perhaps this was not surprising, though, given its renown as a co-pioneer in Distance Education in North Carolina.