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9 results for College buildings--Greenville
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Record #:
22801
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Located on the southwest corner of Third and Evans streets, the Rialto Block was built in 1896 by Joseph P. Elliot & Brother of Baltimore, MD. The block contained numerous stores which burned in 1897 and was rebuilt. The corner building of the Rialto was home to The Daily Reflector from 1901 until 1956. It later became Biggs Drug Store, then Hargett’s Drug Store, and after a number of businesses, reopened as Courtside Café. In 1896, Joseph P. Elliot and his brother built the Rialto, located on the southwest corner of Third and Evans Streets, to provide a brick block for all the Elliot brothers' many stores. One section housed The Daily Reflector offices from January 1901 until 1956. The Daily Reflector's move in 1957 reduced the building to one-story and it is now a cafe.
Record #:
36076
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Among East Carolina Teacher’s Training School’s collection of historically famous facts was the source of the first spring break. Despite modern technology’s absence, the first president’s promise to have the college re-opened in ten days was kept. For this article, the promise kept was also illustrated in pictures. Accompanied photos chronicled the rebuilding of the current Old Cafeteria Building and former Refectory between April 2nd-12th, 1915.
Record #:
36079
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The YWCA, constructed in 1925, was known for many firsts, in its purposes for the students of East Carolina Teachers’ College. It was the first student group on campus; first student government; first student store. As for its last building, the Y Hut, that served as the student center until it was cleared to make way for the construction of Joyner Library.
Record #:
36081
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Among ECU’s accomplishments can be added Aramark and the Volunteer and Service Learning Center’s collaborative creation of Campus Kitchen. It was the first among institutions in the UNC system. As for other ECU students’ food-related endeavors, mentioned was their packing of care packages for military members serving overseas.
Record #:
36083
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Expansion of ECTTS’s Power House entailed electricity on campus seven days a week. Lofty in height and reputation, the Power House chimney stood tall on the mall until the late 1970s.
Record #:
36102
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The title alluded to the first treasurer, who arrived in 1912. As important in overseeing ECTTS’s fiscal matters was his wife and the co-treasurer, Jonetta Webb Spilman. Expected then is their jointly accomplishments in many ways. Among them: cashed strapped students stay in school; the 1932 annual dedicated to them; an administration building named in their honor.
Record #:
36100
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Through most of ECU’s history, the number of female students has been larger, with this reality palpable particularly in the residence halls. In fact, the number of male students was so low by 1912 that Wilson and Jarvis became female dorms. Male students rented rooms in town until 1919, when the number dropped to zero.
Record #:
36112
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In the midst of celebrating ECTC’s twenty fifth anniversary was mourning the death of its first president, Robert Wright. In the midst of mourning, there was a remembrance of ECTC’s accomplishments: becoming a four year college that offered graduate studies; increasing its faculty from 12 to 90; increasing its student body from 175 to more than a 1000. In the midst of mourning was also a remembrance of how its first president helped them come to pass.
Record #:
36114
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Among ECU’s famous firsts was Fletcher Residence Hall, the first campus building to have elevators. The building, opening in 1964, was named for novelist Inglis Fletcher. It attained the nickname “skyscraper dorm” from being the tallest building in Northeastern North Carolina at that time. The seven story building remained the highest high-rise until its residential neighbor, ten story White Residence Hall, opened in 1968.