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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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7 results for Fletcher, Inglis, 1879-1969
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Record #:
1091
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Inglis Fletcher's literary career and her interest in the history and people of North Carolina are chronicled in her papers housed at East Carolina University's J. Y. Joyner Library.
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Record #:
10406
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Inglis Fletcher is one of North Carolina's best-known novelists. Her ten historical novels deal with the Albemarle region during Colonial times. On April 14, 1961, Inglis Fletcher Day was celebrated in Edenton.
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Record #:
15647
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North Carolina novelist Inglis Fletcher discusses one of the adventures she finds in writing historical novels--the characters' conduct. The author never quite knows what they will do or how they will behave. Sometimes characters just take over the novel and head off doing and saying things the author hadn't planned.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 6, Aug 1955, p12, por
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Record #:
37206
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Article about the life of Inglis Fletcher (1879-1969) and her twelve novels.
Record #:
36114
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Among ECU’s famous firsts was Fletcher Residence Hall, the first campus building to have elevators. The building, opening in 1964, was named for novelist Inglis Fletcher. It attained the nickname “skyscraper dorm” from being the tallest building in Northeastern North Carolina at that time. The seven story building remained the highest high-rise until its residential neighbor, ten story White Residence Hall, opened in 1968.
Record #:
38976
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(Minnia) Inglis Fletcher , a native of Illinois, went to art school for sculpture and ended up being a leading novelist in North Carolina. She married a mining engineer and moved frequently across the country. She began her writing career when she lived in California. Years later, while on a hunt for her ancestors in Tyrrell County, NC, she became enamored with North Carolina history. Fletcher intended to write a twelve-volume Carolina Series of novels based on life in North Carolina from 1765 to 1782. She and her husband moved to North Carolina and purchased Bandon, a plantation manor house near Edenton, NC. Fletcher’s husband died in 1960 and Bandon burned in 1963, which drastically changed her life. The Carolina Series has been translated into seven languages.