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11 results for Novelists--North Carolina
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Record #:
10406
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Abstract:
Inglis Fletcher is one of North Carolina's best-known novelists. Her ten historical novels deal with the Albemarle region during Colonial times. On April 14, 1961, Inglis Fletcher Day was celebrated in Edenton.
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Record #:
16399
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Time Was, a novel by John Foster West, a writer-in-residence at Appalachian State University, is full of folklore and folk language on almost every page. The novel exposes various folk remedies and superstitions, folk songs and games, folk imagery, and folk speech and poetry.
Record #:
16839
Author(s):
Abstract:
In North Carolina, 20th-century writers began to explore popular genres inclding murder mysteries and science fiction. Murder mystery were initially popular in the western portion of the state, but quickly spread when authors such as James Hay, Jr., Dorothy Ogburn, and Tom Wicker began writing them. Science fiction and its sub-genre fantasy also became, and the state's greatest contributor to this literary area was Manly Wade Wellman who drew inspiration from ballads, folklore, and place names of western North Carolina.
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Record #:
20675
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Allan Gurganus, Hillsborough native and novelist, recently finished his latest work Local Souls. His fans have waited over a decade for a new novel, the last being Plays Well With Others published in 1997. The author interviews Gurganus who discusses recent state politics, his time in the Navy, and his most recent work which is a collection of three novellas.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 30 Issue 35, Aug 2013, p17, 19, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
20732
Author(s):
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Monica Byrne is a Durham native and aspiring novelist and playwright. Her first novel The Girl in the Road was signed by Crown Publishing. Following this success, her play What Every Girl Should Know will premiere at the New York International Fringe Festival.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 30 Issue 37, Sept 2013, p15-17, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
23312
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Monique Truong details how growing up in North Carolina as a Vietnamese war refugee shaped her identity as an author. This interview took place after the release of her novel, 'Bitter in the Mouth.'
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Record #:
27244
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Abstract:
Adam O’Fallon Price is the former bassist for The Mayflies USA, a power pop band in Chapel Hill that earned national notices in the late nineties. Now Price debuts as a novelist, drawing on his band experience with some authorial sleight of hand. The Grand Tour is a book about a washed-up fiction writer who gets a second wind from a Vietnam War memoir and a fan he meets on his book tour.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 31, August 2016, p23, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
28859
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John Ehle is identified with the start of the North Carolina School of Arts, and recently published his latest novel, Last One Home. Ehle discusses the future of North Carolina’s arts and its role in society.
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NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Sept 1985, p3, por
Record #:
28874
Author(s):
Abstract:
80 years ago, author Carson McCullers began working in Charlotte on her best-selling novel The Heart is a Lonely Hunter. McCullers setting in her novel is similar to the setting of Charlotte today and many of the same issues she wrote about then, are still relevant now. McCullers struggled with her sexual identity and fitting in and the author of the article wonders if much would have changed for McCullers if she were alive and trying to write the same novel today. The history of the novel, the author, and the social issues of the periods are discussed.
Record #:
35907
Author(s):
Abstract:
Spotlighted was a famous NC author in the running for a commemorative stamp and his most famous work, Look Homeward, Angel. Or at least in writing—play and screenplay—was the novel still renowned. As the author revealed, the best known work produced by this native son has experienced a sales decline since WWII. The best evidence for Wolfe readership’s decrease to Owen, though, was in the dearth of college students familiar with Wolfe works.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 8, Oct 1980, p14
Record #:
39920
Author(s):
Abstract:
The setting in Shelia Turnage’s novels proves that facts from a writer’s life always find their way into his or her fiction. Tupelo’s Landing resembles the town where Turnage lives and any small town in the South. Evidence includes a list of lines quoted from her Dale and Mo mystery series.
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Greenville: Life in the East (NoCar F264 G8 G743), Vol. Issue , Fall 2015 , p50-52, 54