NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


10 results for High Point
Currently viewing results 1 - 10
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
587
Author(s):
Abstract:
The furniture industry plays a significant role in the economies of High Point and the state.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 48 Issue 10, Oct 1990, p22-25, il
Record #:
24212
Author(s):
Abstract:
The world's largest furniture marketplace happens twice a year in High Point. The furniture shows take place in High Point because that was once where the industry was centered. Now, the High Point market's future is in jeopardy and Las Vegas thinks it has the answer: building a new home for the market and leveraging its advantages in entertainment accommodations, restaurants, and glamour.
Full Text:
Record #:
24680
Author(s):
Abstract:
John R. Peacock of High Point, North Carolina is forming a group with the intention of studying neglected facts from the Civil War. The author highlights Peacock’s contributions to Civil War historical studies.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 15, December 1954, p12-13, por
Full Text:
Record #:
31120
Abstract:
While local governments are making efforts to create more inclusive social policies, little is known about what these policies are and how they are developed. To better understand municipal immigrant integration practices, my Master’s Thesis, Building Integrated Communities: Innovative Bureaucratic Incorporation Strategies for North Carolina, completed in May 2012 examined integration using two methods: 1) analyzing strategies local jurisdictions employ across the country to integrate immigrants and 2) presenting a case study to better understand the contextual, structural, and institutional factors of a two-year strategic planning process to develop an immigrant integration plan in three local jurisdictions in North Carolina, a new immigrant destination. From this analysis, I gleaned practical recommendations for other local governments interested in developing similar immigrant integration initiatives that will be discussed in this article.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 38 Issue , 2013, p9-16, il, bibl
Full Text:
Record #:
35678
Author(s):
Abstract:
With a Tar Heel reporter interviewing, readers might have expected to hear how Northern producers could comfortably integrate their business into Southern culture. With the NC Shakespeare Festival’s prominence, another expectation could have been these producers’ plan could make theatre a more popular form of entertainment for all.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 4, July/Aug 1978, p12-14, 36-40
Record #:
36990
Abstract:
Among the 1,100 cameras in Ken Toda’s Huemax are 1940s reporter cameras, 1920s’ portrait photographer cameras, and 1880s wet-plate cameras. Toda, who assists collectors and hobbyists worldwide, helps to upkeep High Point’s role in developing photography as a medium.
Record #:
35820
Abstract:
The guide featured ten towns, spanning Coast to Mountains. Profiles highlighted what made each town unique. Sup worthy restaurants included Durham’s Bullock’s Barbeque, Greensboro’s the Hungry Fisherman, and The Blue Stove in Pinehurst—Southern Pines. Historical sites included the old Market House in Fayetteville, Wilmington’s Thalian Hall, Raleigh’s Oakwood section, and Bethabara in Winston-Salem. Entertainment hubs included the Charlotte Motor Speedway, High Point’s North Carolina Shakespeare Festival, and Asheville’s Thomas Wolfe Auditorium.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 1, Feb 1980, p19-21, 23-24, 26, 28-34, 36-41
Record #:
35853
Author(s):
Abstract:
Railroading in this case involved Pullman cars. Riding the rails the fashioned way was still possible through the National Railroad Historic Society and smaller model railroad groups. Highlighting the difference of the train experience not by Amtrak were factors involved with steam and coal power locomotives. Illustrating the uniqueness also was a description of a trip starting in Roanoke and ending in Greensboro.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 4, May 1980, p17-19
Record #:
36272
Author(s):
Abstract:
With an increasing number of Americans living the golden years, facilities such as Continuing Care Retirement Communities (CCRCs) are experiencing a financial and occupational boom. Asserting the ever growing need for facilities such as the profiled Belle Meade and Plantation Estates were statistics for this elderly population and health conditions such as Alzheimer’s.
Record #:
38246
Author(s):
Abstract:
The former owner of one of the nation’s largest Oriental rug distributorships proves success is measured in more than revenue. Proceeds from Zaki Khalifa’s business donated to Akhuwat will partly fulfill his mission: to help Pakistani children have a better quality life. The other part of his mission involves a new career path: teaching Pakistani children at Akhuwat schools.