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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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12 results for Furniture
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Record #:
11038
Abstract:
Carolina Panel Company Inc., located in Lexington, is known as a manufacturer of quality plywood. However, the product is not prefinished wall panels or utility grade fir. The company distinguishes itself by specializing in hardwood plywood, a product tailor-made to the furniture manufacturer's assembly line.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 28 Issue 11, Nov 1970, p210-211, 262, il
Record #:
21905
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This article examines 18th and 19th century furniture collected by the Historic Hope Foundation that represents the style of the Roanoke River basin. This furniture documents an identifiable regional style that was adapted from Great Britain and metropolitan areas of the Lower Chesapeake.
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Record #:
21919
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This article examines the use of white pine, a type of wood not grown in the South, in the 18th and 19th century production of furniture found throughout Southern homes. The trade patterns between North and South is discussed as well as Southern furniture makers such as C.J. Tooker of Fayetteville.
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Record #:
21935
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This article examines the development of regional furniture styles in the Catawaba Valley of the North Carolina Piedmont through an anonymous group of furniture called the 'fluted pilaster group.' The Catawaba Valley style of furniture is heavily influenced by Delaware Valley settlers who moved to Catawaba Valley during the last half of the 18th century.
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Record #:
23863
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Brian Boggs is leading the handmade furniture industry in Asheville, North Carolina. His goal is 'construction with a conscience,' as the woodworker focuses on using wood from locally felled trees and supports sustainable forestry management.
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Record #:
24212
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The world's largest furniture marketplace happens twice a year in High Point. The furniture shows take place in High Point because that was once where the industry was centered. Now, the High Point market's future is in jeopardy and Las Vegas thinks it has the answer: building a new home for the market and leveraging its advantages in entertainment accommodations, restaurants, and glamour.
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Record #:
24221
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Century Furniture in Hickory has been operating since 1947, making custom pieces for a hefty price, even though the furniture industry in North Carolina has decreased since 1993.
Record #:
24302
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This excerpt from 'Closing' details the closing of White Furniture Co., a century old furniture manufacturer in Mebane, North Carolina. The company had been sold to a conglomerate in 1993 and was then shut down, causing 203 people to lose their jobs. In the 1990s, this was a common situation, when Americans lost their jobs to layoffs, outsourcing, downsizing, buyouts, and off-shoring.
Record #:
27638
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New discoveries in Virginia and North Carolina furniture were made by researchers at the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. The construction, style, and histories of the signed furniture pieces identify them as products of Mardun V. Eventon from eastern Virginia.
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Record #:
27844
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During the first third of the nineteenth century, the sugar chest was a common piece of furniture among people of the upper and upper-middle class in parts of Tennessee and Kentucky. Sugar was safeguarded due to its high cost, relative scarcity and importance in entertainment customs. Sugar chests were also used in North Carolina, many of which were produced by John C. Burgner of Waynesville.
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Record #:
36220
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Ayden’s George Snyder captured French and Japanese influences in furniture and wallpaper murals. Among the descriptions of his works, capturing a broader view of history, were details of his personal history, which revealed a lifelong and intergenerational passion for art.
Source:
Greenville Times (NoCar Oversize F264 G72 G77), Vol. Issue , April/May 2015, p30-38
Record #:
36222
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Gianino Fine Studio Furniture could measure its historic value in handmade items, such as a cherry fall-front desk made in the 1820s and molding planes dating from the nineteenth century. Its personal value could be measured in a trade passed down three generations and tools belonging to grandparents, donated to Gianino to perpetuate their use.
Source:
Greenville Times (NoCar Oversize F264 G72 G77), Vol. Issue , Summer 2015, p28-37