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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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24 results for Charlotte
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Record #:
622
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An entire special section is dedicated to the city of Charlotte, its economy and its people.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 2, Feb 1991, pA3-A30, il
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Record #:
1608
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Charlotte landed the Carolina Panthers NFL franchise with the aid of North Carolina's other major urban areas. The Queen City is quick to share the credit for its success with Raleigh-Durham, the Triad, and Greenville-Spartanburg, SC.
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22660
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Charlotte offers many options for inexpensive shopping, services and entertainment. Here are a few suggestions for discovering the best that Charlotte has to offer without going broke.
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Record #:
22662
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This article is a comprehensive guide to the private schools located around the Charlotte area.
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Record #:
22775
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Every June since the 1980s, HeroesCon occupies the Charlotte Convention Center. Considered one of the best independent comic conventions in the country, the event is an extension of Shelton Drum's comic book store, Heroes Aren't Hard to Find. The story of this business and Charlotte's growing comic culture says much about the success of this annual convention.
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24435
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In May 1791, George Washington visited Charlotte, North Carolina and found it to be an unimpressive and ‘trifling place.’ This article discusses why the President felt that way and how the city has since changed.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 60 Issue 12, May 1993, p10-14, por
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Record #:
24906
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Greg Lacour discusses the unfortunate state of unemployment in North Carolina, particularly how it has affected an 82 year old known as Street. He was laid off in June due to another vendor was hired, leaving him with a very small stipend from the unemployment office.
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Record #:
24917
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A population shift since 1983 has now resulted in a African American majority in Charlotte. This has numerous political implications in the upcoming mayoral and city council elections.
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24926
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After firing the longtime County Manager Harry Jones, the Mecklenburg County Board of Commissioners is dragging their feet in finding a new one. Some say due to a lack of experience in finding such candidates, others are saying a lack of planning was involved.
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Record #:
24968
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Belk has been a top department store in the country for years. Company managers attribute their success to tying their brand to the south. While some may argue that doing so was a risky move, the company has not found this approach to be limiting their success.
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Record #:
24966
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Jeffrey Leak describes his view of the black south from both his and his family’s perspective. Their similar but differing experiences help define distinctive southern and modern aspects of Charlotte identity.
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24970
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Many have noticed that the southern accent seems to be disappearing from North Carolina. Michael Graff went on a mission to find out why.
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24967
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Jeremy Markovich describes the similarities he sees between Charlotte, NC and his native Ohio. Both regions have seen staple industries go bust with extensive job displacement and dislocation of families.
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Record #:
24965
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Tommy Tomlinson answers the question of whether Charlotte is truly southern. From the southern twang in speech, to the NFL team they host, all factors are considered to determine if Charlotte truly is a southern town.
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Record #:
24969
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Hade Robinson, personal stylist manager for Nordstrom, describes the southern style and identity in terms of color tones, jewelry, and gender.
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