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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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15 results for Elderly care
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Record #:
15800
Abstract:
In the past institutionalization has been an expensive answer to the long-term care of ill and disabled elderly for North Carolina. Alternatives to this are home health and geriatric day care, both allowing the aged the option of remaining in the community by supplementing family support for aged members. This article attempts to analyze the alternatives as they operate in North Carolina.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Winter 1976, p26-34, f
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Record #:
23956
Abstract:
Billman speaks to Kim Thomas about the low pay but intense work of a personal care aide for the elderly. Half of North Carolina home care workers make less than 10 dollars an hour.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 32 Issue 32, August 2015, p9-11, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
24456
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Abstract:
North Carolina’s Elderhostel programs are like summer camp for grown-ups, teaching skills such as how to play folk instruments and how to carve duck decoys for hunting. A number of schools participate in the Elderhostel programs, including Appalachian State University, John C. Campbell Folk School, and Mars Hill College.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 58 Issue 12, May 1991, p41-45, il
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Record #:
25703
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Dr. Patricia F. Lindsey spends her summers at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Her research employs virtual reality as a design tool, allowing users to experience a prototype environment to create the best possible setting for medical or elderly care.
Source:
Edge (NoCar LD 1741 E44 E33), Vol. Issue , Spring 1999, p28 Periodical Website
Record #:
26102
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sheryl Zimmerman and Philip Sloane are codirectors of the Program on Aging, Disablement, and Long-Term Care. They intend to identify what characteristics of nursing homes and assisted-living facilities have a positive effect on residents. One area they are exploring is reminiscence therapy.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 17 Issue 3, Spring 2001, p17-19, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
27367
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Abstract:
Ruth Moose of Albemarle recounts the indignity of her mother’s care in a nursing home. Circumstances often force the elderly into nursing homes as their dependents cannot afford care. In such nursing homes, the residents do not always experience a high quality of care and they suffer for it. This story will become more common as dependents over 65 in North Carolina will increase by 20 percent over the next 20 years.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 9 Issue 1, Jan. 3-8 1991, p8-9 Periodical Website
Record #:
29413
Abstract:
North Carolina is experiencing major changes in its age structure as life expectancies have increased, birth rates decreased, and population migration occurred. Between 1980 and 2010, the number of North Carolina residents sixty-five and older is expected to dramatically increase. This report examined cause-specific mortality rates for three elderly age groups by race and sex.
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SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 51, June 1989, p1-39, bibl, f
Record #:
31728
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Abstract:
Sampson County’s John T. Denning used to head the AARP. Now he’s retired, but still fighting. After retiring multiple times, the first time being 1971, Denning now serves on multiple committees and organizations that advocate for elderly issues. These include affordable healthcare, workplace equality and universal respect for the elderly.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 59 Issue 3, Aug 1991, p33-34, por
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Record #:
32558
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Abstract:
North Carolina’s population of people over the age of sixty-five is increasing and searching for alternative accommodations. Dr. W. W. Dickson, a veterinarian in Gastonia, founded Covenant Village, Inc., a combination retirement home and nursing center. The center aims to provide comfortable living with access to recreation and health services.
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Record #:
34408
Abstract:
Hillary Jarman is a R.N. Case Manager at Aseracare Hospice in Winterville. Jarman describes hospice as “comfort care” and focuses on celebrating patients’ lives, their accomplishments, the people they have touched and the seeds they have planted. In this article, Jarman discusses her experiences working in hospice and the types of elderly patients she has cared for.
Source:
Greenville: Life in the East (NoCar F264 G8 G743), Vol. Issue , Summer 2018, p20-25, il, por
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Record #:
36569
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Asheville’s Council on Aging offers services allowing elderly people on fixed incomes to live independently and economically in their own residences. The nonprofit organization provides services free of charge such as minor household repairs; Call-a-Ride, for those unable to drive or access public transportation; 911 Emergency Cell Phones, for at-risk seniors; In-Home Aide Services, to assist with completing daily tasks; Heat Relief, which provides fans and air conditioners during the summer. Funds and labor are provided primarily through the support of volunteers and donations from individuals.
Record #:
36265
Author(s):
Abstract:
With an increase in elderly populations, facilities such as CCRCs, home health agencies, assisted living centers, and nursing homes are all the more a must. Illustrating the need and benefits of these services are statistics related to elderly populations, changes in socio-cultural values related to the heightened need, and profiles for facilities such as River Landing in Wallace.
Record #:
36274
Abstract:
Medical advancements possible over the next decade included cryopreservation, controlling prosthetic limbs with the mind, and nanotechnology. Areas projected for improvement or further development over the next ten years included gene therapy, noninvasive technology, and cure of Dementia diseases. As for an area the author acknowledges is not clear, it involves medical ethics: when to cease providing procedures, especially where age is concerned.
Record #:
36272
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With an increasing number of Americans living the golden years, facilities such as Continuing Care Retirement Communities (CCRCs) are experiencing a financial and occupational boom. Asserting the ever growing need for facilities such as the profiled Belle Meade and Plantation Estates were statistics for this elderly population and health conditions such as Alzheimer’s.
Record #:
38176
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Abstract:
What the author called “the silver tsunami” is increasingly evident in town and metros alike, from factors such as baby boomers entering retirement. Addressing elderly-specific issues is church programs focusing on topics like dementia. Helping to improve the quality of life for impoverished elders is government programs such as Centralina Area Agency on Aging, which helps with needs like transportation. Along with church and government programs there is the Meck 60+ project, a needs assessment study calibrating the number of elderly individuals and the extent of issues and needs related to aging.