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14 results for Moose, Ruth
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Record #:
6260
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Abstract:
Twenty square miles of land in the Piedmont, touching Moore, Montgomery, and Randolph Counties, have become famous in recent years for reviving the art of traditional pottery. The first known potter was J. D. Craven, who settled there in 1857. Of the forty or so shops that operated in the region, only a half dozen remain today. Moose discusses the potters and their craft.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1979, p45-47, il, map
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Record #:
8947
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Carolyn Trail of Norwood orders wheat for weaving from Minnesota where it is organically grown and cut by hand. She makes baskets, wall hangings, and house blessings. Trail enjoys teaching her craft to local Girl Scouts as well as other townspeople. She hopes to soon work with a grower closer to home.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 12, May 1980, p20-21, il
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Record #:
8975
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Alice and Taylor Nance of Churchland bought a log cabin with eight acres of land about ten years ago. They renovated the house, putting electricity and insulation in themselves, and moved in while still working on it. Although originally intended as a summer retreat, the Nances now live in the restored five-room cabin.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 6, Nov 1978, p24, 35, il
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Record #:
9979
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At Pfeiffer College in Misenheimer students participate yearly in staging a Shakespearean play, on little to no budget where students act, direct, and produce. TWELFTH NIGHT was performed, supervised by English Department faculty Melicent Huneycutt.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 41 Issue 7, Dec 1973, p22-23, 39, por
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Record #:
9982
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Cornelia Wern Henderson taught skills and old arts such as candle dipping, lye soap making, butter churning, open hearth cooking, and fashioning dolls from cornhusks to adolescents in a class called “Log Cabin Living” at the Charlotte Children's Nature Museum.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 41 Issue 8, Jan 1974, p13, por
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Record #:
10083
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Waxhaw, a small town in Union County, holds an annual performance called \"Listen and Remember\" that commemorates the town's history and heritage. The month long series showcases several assembly programs that includes speeches and dramas and also contains several dinners among the festivities. The series is completely funded by ticket sales and contributions.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 39 Issue 1, June 1971, p16-17, 25, por
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Record #:
12258
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Moose discusses the writing career of Heather Ross Miller of Badin.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 10, Mar 1975, p27-28, il
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Record #:
13857
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Talmadge Moose grew up in Stanly County during the 1930s and 40s. The first member of his family to go to college, he changed his major to follow his first love, art. His work earned him a national reputation, but his creations never strayed far from his roots. Ruth Moose remembers her husband in this OUR STATE article.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 78 Issue 11, Apr 2011, p160-162, 164, 166, 168, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
15363
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The North Carolina School for the Deaf, located in Morganton, opened in 1894. Moose discusses how the students there are taught the meaning of words, how to play musical instruments, sing and perform other accomplishments.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 2 Issue 26, Nov 1934, p7, 23, por
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Record #:
27367
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Ruth Moose of Albemarle recounts the indignity of her mother’s care in a nursing home. Circumstances often force the elderly into nursing homes as their dependents cannot afford care. In such nursing homes, the residents do not always experience a high quality of care and they suffer for it. This story will become more common as dependents over 65 in North Carolina will increase by 20 percent over the next 20 years.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 9 Issue 1, Jan. 3-8 1991, p8-9 Periodical Website
Record #:
31559
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Abstract:
North Carolina offers some excellent places to bird watch, and the opportunity to participate in bird-count studies with local chapters of the National Audubon Society. Birders are particularly interested in sightings of bluebirds, whose population has drastically reduced due to competition from starlings and house sparrows. This article discusses bird watching and how to find bluebird populations in North Carolina.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 10 Issue 2, Feb 1978, p8-10, il, map Periodical Website
Record #:
35601
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Abstract:
In 1972, Doris Betts wrote the novel “The River to Pickle Beach,” about life in a small North Carolina town. Betts imbued her work with folkloric elements, such as superstitions and speech, native to North Carolina; in this article, Moose highlights those elements and explains some of them.
Record #:
35635
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The title, echoing a shout by her fellow schoolchildren, hinted at the poverty stricken circumstances revealed in her clothes. Christmas Day, though, was an occasion to forget all she lacked, because of presents given by relatives in California. The present most cherished was a copy of Louisa May Alcott, Little Women; she could relate all too well to its main characters, the Marsh family.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 6, Dec 1977, p8-10, 18
Record #:
35851
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Abstract:
A mute peddler the author called “the vanilla man” offered a string of pearls with the purchase of his product. Its true value, she realized, was irrevocably lost with the string of pearls broken.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 3, Apr 1980, p26-27, 55