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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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28 results for Books--Reviews
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Record #:
18697
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Jonathan Yardley of The Washington Post wrote this review for John Ehle's novel The Winter People in 1982. In the review, Yardley discusses the appeal of the novel and the way that Ehle conveys the culture of North Carolina.
Record #:
18764
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In this review for Wayne Caldwell's novels Cataloochee and Requiem by Fire, Chris Green examines the way in which Caldwell explores a North Carolina mountain community and how that community disbands after the creation of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.
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Record #:
30902
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North Carolina’s diverse culture has inspired many distinctive guidebooks, including two new books on native writers, arts and agriculture. Book reviews are provided for “Literary Trails of the North Carolina Mountains: A Guidebook” by Georgann Eubanks, and “Homegrown/Handmade: Art Roads and Farm Trails” by John F. Blair.
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Record #:
30992
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Two new books by historian and third-generation tobacco grower, Billy Yeargin, recall North Carolina’s rich tobacco heritage through photographs, residents’ recollections and geographical research. In “North Carolina Tobacco: A History,” Yeargin explores the influence of tobacco on the state’s history, describing when communities were founded and built upon tobacco culture.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 40 Issue 9, Sept 2008, p26-27, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
31072
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Over the past 450 years, an untold number of vessels vanished off the Outer Banks without any documentation or evidence. In his newly published book, “Shipwrecks of the Outer Banks - An Illustrated Guide,” Kevin Duffus provides a visual record of shipwrecks and their legacy. True stories are told about lifesaving, salvage, rumors of wreckers, and the hundreds of forgotten shipwreck victims buried in the Graveyard of the Atlantic.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 38 Issue 10, Oct 2006, p14-15, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
35253
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This is a book review of “Anglo-Saxon Riddles of the Exeter Book.”
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Record #:
35446
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Kathleen Morehouse wrote Rain on the Just in the latter half of the nineteenth century, about the fictional Allen family in Wilkesboro, NC. A synopsis of the novel is given, and then the elements of folklore, particularly folk speech, are identified and discussed.
Record #:
35447
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Romulus Linney wrote Heathen Valley in 1962 about a group of peoples residing in the North Carolina Mountains and how they responded to an overly zealous missionary. The story is filled with folk speech, myths, traditional medicine, and other folk elements to portray the characters as accurately as possible.
Record #:
35453
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Season of Fear, written by Guy Owen in 1960, is about a lonely, middle-aged man whose hindered psychological developments and sexual frustrations lead him to commit violent acts. The book is riddled with imagery pertaining to sexuality, particularly from serpents and reptiles.
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Record #:
35495
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This is a synopsis of the novel Sea-Gift, written by Edwin W. Fuller in 1873. The author of the article believes this to be the earliest example of tall tale narratives in America.
Record #:
35536
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The author issues a response with some clarifications to an analysis done on her novel Rain on the Just. The analysis, done by John Foster West, was a part of a previous issue of NC Folklore, published in March 1971.
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Record #:
35601
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In 1972, Doris Betts wrote the novel “The River to Pickle Beach,” about life in a small North Carolina town. Betts imbued her work with folkloric elements, such as superstitions and speech, native to North Carolina; in this article, Moose highlights those elements and explains some of them.
Record #:
35616
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By using “The Wife of Bath,” a story within Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales, the author takes an in-depth look at how perceptions in society may have changed the meaning of the proverbs used in the story between the 14th century and the present.
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Record #:
35629
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The Foxfire Book was a collection of folklore collected by students from their grandmothers. Dorson reviews the process and outcomes of the study, which he deemed unskilled and did not meet the criteria of folklore.
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Record #:
35658
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In response to a scathing review of the Foxfire book in a previous issue, Wigginton defends and addresses the criticism made about his book.
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