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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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22 results for Sayings and phrases
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Record #:
21399
Author(s):
Abstract:
In both North and South Carolina, there is a story of a supposed conversation between the governors of the two states in which one remarks to the other, 'It's a damn long time between drinks.' Historians have attempted to track down the saying to its origin but have had little success. Purported roots of the saying have been identified between governors in 1838, 1867, and the 1870s.
Source:
Administration of Justice Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7908 .A15 U6), Vol. 59 Issue 2, 1982, p160-171 , il, por, f
Subject(s):
Record #:
35082
Abstract:
This is a collection of sayings that were commonly found on wooden plaques in novelty shops in western North Carolina.
Record #:
35148
Abstract:
The origin story of the phrase “talking to Buncombe,” which means to simply speak for show.
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Record #:
35143
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Abstract:
A collection of epitaphs the author collected from cemeteries, some lighthearted, others of a darker nature.
Record #:
35150
Author(s):
Abstract:
This is the author’s take on the origin of the phrase “he ought to be bored for the simples.”
Record #:
35159
Author(s):
Abstract:
Several pages of sayings, organized alphabetically by the subject matter.
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Record #:
35256
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author uses The Two Angry Women of Abington as a case study for his thesis that use of proverbs greatly increased in the 16th and early 17th centuries. This play has an abundant amount of proverbial lore, and is unique in the way that the playwright did not draw much from written sources for them.
Subject(s):
Record #:
35257
Author(s):
Abstract:
This is a short list of proverbs arranged alphabetically by its subject matter word.
Subject(s):
Record #:
35262
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Abstract:
After a brief introduction to the town of Kipling, the author recorded some of its local expressions, localisms, and other terms.
Record #:
35292
Author(s):
Abstract:
Based in humor from the southwest, “Some Adventures of Simon Suggs” became a famous literature about frontier life. Complete with illustrations and a short biography of the author of the novel, the similes found in the book are categorized by their comparisons.
Record #:
35289
Author(s):
Abstract:
The history of proverbial sayings is long and vast, many of which belong to a set of poetic devices. The author has categorized some of these sayings under headings such as “identified old and familiar sayings,” “unidentified old and familiar sayings,” “humorous and cynical sayings,” and “metaphors and similes.”
Subject(s):
Record #:
35446
Author(s):
Abstract:
Kathleen Morehouse wrote Rain on the Just in the latter half of the nineteenth century, about the fictional Allen family in Wilkesboro, NC. A synopsis of the novel is given, and then the elements of folklore, particularly folk speech, are identified and discussed.
Record #:
35447
Author(s):
Abstract:
Romulus Linney wrote Heathen Valley in 1962 about a group of peoples residing in the North Carolina Mountains and how they responded to an overly zealous missionary. The story is filled with folk speech, myths, traditional medicine, and other folk elements to portray the characters as accurately as possible.