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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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16 results for Folk speech
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Record #:
16310
Author(s):
Abstract:
While growing up by the sea at Beaufort, Borden Mace spoke the English for which the area is noted. After a distinguished career in educational film production, Mace was lured to the helm of the Appalachian Consortium with headquarters on the campus of Appalachian State University at Boone. In his travels in Appalachia he became acquainted with the folk speech of the region, nothing that, like the speech of coastal Carolina, it possessed a Middle English flavor. Fascinated by the lore and speech ways of the Appalachia, Mace published the first recent history of Western North Carolina and a collection of mountain speech and idiom in BITS OF MOUNTAIN SPEECH.
Record #:
16317
Author(s):
Abstract:
Whitener presents a selection of columns from his weekly newspaper column, \"Folk-Ways and Folk-Speech.\" He reports of authentic folklore through interviews, stories, and tales.
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Record #:
16354
Author(s):
Abstract:
The importance of fried fatback in the diet of Southern African Americans and poor whites has long been recognized, but a Carolina colloquialism which describes it as Texas Chicken, seems to have escaped the notice of lexicographers, folklorists, and dialect scholars. The North Carolina phrase is an example of the ethnophaulism or ethnic slur that figures prominently in the folk speech of many regions of the United States. Study of such phrases not only sheds light on the foodways of a people, but also reveals latent attitudes toward outsiders.
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Record #:
35182
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This is a list of folk speech submitted by the author’s students. It is organized alphabetically with analysis and translation for each word.
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Record #:
35262
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After a brief introduction to the town of Kipling, the author recorded some of its local expressions, localisms, and other terms.
Record #:
35282
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By using “the Wolf and the Fox in a Well” as a case study, the author analyzes the differences in story and style in its different variations.
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Record #:
35296
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Written by a Baptist minister, “Fischer’s River Scenes and Characters” portrays the customs and social life of people in the southern mountains of North Carolina. Customs, attitudes, anecdotes, and tall tales are all included in the author’s analysis of the book.
Record #:
35292
Author(s):
Abstract:
Based in humor from the southwest, “Some Adventures of Simon Suggs” became a famous literature about frontier life. Complete with illustrations and a short biography of the author of the novel, the similes found in the book are categorized by their comparisons.
Record #:
35354
Author(s):
Abstract:
As an avid collector of all things folklore, the author begins the article with an overview of some of the superstitions, speech, home remedies, and place name origins. The last part of the article deals with humorous anecdotes and jokes he had come across in Kentucky. With illustration.
Record #:
35446
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Kathleen Morehouse wrote Rain on the Just in the latter half of the nineteenth century, about the fictional Allen family in Wilkesboro, NC. A synopsis of the novel is given, and then the elements of folklore, particularly folk speech, are identified and discussed.
Record #:
35452
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The author analyzes his own work to decipher how folklore has influenced the novels he has written.
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Record #:
35601
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In 1972, Doris Betts wrote the novel “The River to Pickle Beach,” about life in a small North Carolina town. Betts imbued her work with folkloric elements, such as superstitions and speech, native to North Carolina; in this article, Moose highlights those elements and explains some of them.
Record #:
35675
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the 1500s, Ben Jonson was a notable playwright for satirical comedies. Tale of a Tub is a comedy about marriages arranged on St. Valentine’s Day. The play is filled with folk customs, speech, and ballads from the time.
Record #:
35747
Abstract:
This discography of folk songs covers several regions of North Carolina, ethnic traditions, and folklore genres. Part one was included in NC Folklore Journal Volume 19, issue 3.
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Record #:
35748
Abstract:
An unusual pattern of speech arose on the Outer Banks of North Carolina, namely switching the ‘v’ and ‘w’ sounds at the beginning of words. The authors were given an example of a song that included this phenomenon, “Wictory shall be mine.”