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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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18 results for Linguistics
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Record #:
25730
Author(s):
Abstract:
David Mora-Marin is an assistant professor of linguistics and one of the few specialists in ancient Mayan languages from around 400 BC to 200 AD. A recent article was published about the writing system used by the Olmecs, the first civilization in Mesoamerica. Mora-Marin analyzed the Olmec writing tablet and found patterns that contradict the researchers’ findings.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 25 Issue 2, Winter 2009, p18-21, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26050
Author(s):
Abstract:
Laura Janda, professor of Slavic linguistics, studies the complexities of aspect and other Slavic grammatical categories. Janda uses rocks, sand, blocks of wood, and ping-pong balls to explain aspects which require adding a marking to every noun, pronoun, and verb in a sentence to indicate relationships among objects and ideas.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 19 Issue 3, Spring 2003, p26-28, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26189
Author(s):
Abstract:
Craig Melchert, professor of linguistics, studies extinct Anatolian languages. Anatolian developed from a language spoken by Indo-European people who moved to Asia Minor from north of the Black Sea by 2000 B.C. Melchert traces the linguistic history to understand how ancient people thought and lived.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 10 Issue 1, Fall 1992, p16-17, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
29109
Author(s):
Abstract:
The parallels between cultures of American Indians groups and native Asian peoples are highlighted through shared religious mythology and related linguistic patterns. The importance of the serpent and turtle as symbols in both cultures are discussed in depth along with the Flood myth or archetype. Also discussed are the consonant sounds present in the words water and serpent and their presence in the languages of Asiatic peoples and American Indians. One group highlighted in connection to the Asiatic cultures is the Cherokee of the Eastern United States.
Record #:
35334
Author(s):
Abstract:
As tobacco was a popular cash crop in North Carolina, the methods and terms used to raise and harvest the tobacco are shared between regions. From preparing the tobacco beds to selling, and touching on hazards and illegal practices, the author gained most of his knowledge from his grandfather. With illustration.
Record #:
35092
Abstract:
The author recounts how he and a man he dined with puzzled over the origin of a word, “Gowbral.” It ended up being a combination of gar broth, used as a term referring to meanness.
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Record #:
35161
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Abstract:
Illiterate herself, Margaret Rendleman had a man transcribe her will, who spelled the words as he heard and pronounced them.
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Record #:
35182
Author(s):
Abstract:
This is a list of folk speech submitted by the author’s students. It is organized alphabetically with analysis and translation for each word.
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Record #:
35251
Author(s):
Abstract:
From the request to know if the term “Sandlapper” was suitable for a magazine title, the author presents the origin, meaning, and any stigmas attached to the word.
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Record #:
35262
Author(s):
Abstract:
After a brief introduction to the town of Kipling, the author recorded some of its local expressions, localisms, and other terms.
Record #:
35282
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Abstract:
By using “the Wolf and the Fox in a Well” as a case study, the author analyzes the differences in story and style in its different variations.
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Record #:
35292
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Abstract:
Based in humor from the southwest, “Some Adventures of Simon Suggs” became a famous literature about frontier life. Complete with illustrations and a short biography of the author of the novel, the similes found in the book are categorized by their comparisons.
Record #:
35354
Author(s):
Abstract:
As an avid collector of all things folklore, the author begins the article with an overview of some of the superstitions, speech, home remedies, and place name origins. The last part of the article deals with humorous anecdotes and jokes he had come across in Kentucky. With illustration.
Record #:
35375
Author(s):
Abstract:
Written in the same dialect of the setting, this is a story of how a young couple ended up together.
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