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11 results for Cherokee Indians--North Carolina--Religion and mythology
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Record #:
3782
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Abstract:
To the Cherokees, everything in their natural environment - plants, animals, and people - possessed a spirit. Their beliefs were directed toward maintaining a balance in this world, and they felt trouble developed when this balance was upset.
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Record #:
8900
Author(s):
Abstract:
James Mooney of the U.S. Bureau of American Ethnology visited the Cherokee in 1877. He met one Cherokee named Swimmer who had hid in the North Carolina mountains during the Cherokee's forced migration. Swimmer became a tribal doctor, priest, and keeper of traditions. He also severed in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Swimmer's manuscript, compiled by Mooney, is one of the best looks into Cherokee cultural traditions.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 8, Jan 1984, p32, por
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Record #:
15014
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Indians of western North Carolina had many beliefs which they offered in explanation of the things they did not fully understand. For example, according to the Cherokee it was animal-magic that created the mountains and thunder took the form of spirits known as Thunderers.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 10 Issue 43, Mar 1943, p6, 17, f
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Record #:
15431
Abstract:
Many of the Cherokees believe in witches, ghosts, and other supernatural figures, and they have their remedies for guarding against these malignant influences. Ghost may be friendly at times, but witches harm simply because doing so is an inherent trait of their nature. Witches are said to take the form of the mysterious lights that are often seen in western North Carolina, and relatives and friends must guard an ill person all night to prevent a witch or ghost from taking their spirit.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 4 Issue 27, Dec 1936, p5, 18
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Record #:
29103
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Abstract:
This article is meant as a follow-up to the “Judaculla Rock” article by Hiram C. Wilburn in Southern Indian Studies, Volume 4, pages 19-21. The article addresses the geographical locations of Judaculla Rock and other natural features and tries to explain the meanings of these natural features and objects. These natural features and objects are related to the Cherokee mythical creature or character Judaculla. The mythology of the Judaculla is also explained.
Record #:
29102
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author attempts to explain Judaculla Rock and its petroglyphs. The rock is believed to be of Cherokee origin and is located in Cullowhee, Jackson County, North Carolina. An explanation of the mythical Cherokee character Judaculla or Tsul-ka-lu is first described. The author then follows by explaining that he believes the rock is a picture-map of the battle of Tal-i-wa fought in 1755. Evidence for his theory is provided.
Record #:
29106
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Abstract:
The article looks to disprove the idea that Cherokee religious beliefs descended from Mayan or Aztec beliefs. The Cherokee’s belief in the Supreme Being and their high god concept has greater parallels with American Indian tribes of North America and is possibly derived from Asiatic patterns of belief. The Supreme Being and its characteristics are compared with modern Western gods, Mexican tribe’s gods, and ancient Asian people’s gods. Color, dress, ornamentation, symbolism, fertility, and politics, are all discussed in relation to the Supreme Being and his influence on Cherokee religion.
Record #:
29109
Author(s):
Abstract:
The parallels between cultures of American Indians groups and native Asian peoples are highlighted through shared religious mythology and related linguistic patterns. The importance of the serpent and turtle as symbols in both cultures are discussed in depth along with the Flood myth or archetype. Also discussed are the consonant sounds present in the words water and serpent and their presence in the languages of Asiatic peoples and American Indians. One group highlighted in connection to the Asiatic cultures is the Cherokee of the Eastern United States.
Record #:
29105
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Cherokee peoples’ religious views of fire and the sun are analyzed. The article uses the observations of Cherokee religious practices observed and written by Alexander Longe in 1725, James Adair in 1775, and John Howard Payne and Dr. Samuel Butrick between 1825 and 1840. The observations discuss the fire and sun cults within Cherokee religious practices.
Record #:
29117
Abstract:
Presented are several documents in the Cherokee language about the life at the Echota Methodist Mission on Qualla Boundary in the middle of the 19th century. Most of the documents were written by Inoli a Methodist preacher and keeper of the townhouse records. The documents discuss minutes from Sunday School, the conversions of members to the church, and information about early Christian figures.
Record #:
35859
Abstract:
Cherokee referred to a Highlands town and people residing on its reservation. Information about this Native American tribe could be discovered in a guided tour of Oconaluftee Village and places such as a wax museum. Artistic expressions of information inspired by the area’s mythical origins included Little People and This Haunted Land.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 4, May 1980, p54-56