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9 results for Cherokee Indians--History
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Record #:
20749
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article presents evidence of Cherokee migration from the North along with details about the Cherokee people that can be surmised based upon this evidence. Also examined is the development of the nation after settlement, and the impact of that development on the historic Cherokees.
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Record #:
21174
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article examines the scholarly history of North Carolina Cherokee figure of \"Tsali\" (known as Charley to non-Cherokee of his day,) a heroic figure who, according to Cherokee stories, sacrificed his life so that his people could remain in their North Carolina homeland. Information on the removal of the North Carolina Cherokee from the state led by Major General Winfield Scott in included.
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Record #:
21312
Author(s):
Abstract:
The New Deal of the 1930s that impacted Indian society was designed to correct the erroneous policies of the previous 50 years. Despite its best attempts, it failed to have a significant impact on the Cherokee of western North Carolina. The infusion of public money weakened the tribe's economic foothold as members were discouraged from farming and cultural handicraft.
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Record #:
21724
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article examines how the Cherokee Nation, especially its mothers, tried to adapt to the cultural changes forced on them by white Americans during the late 18th and early 19th century while also maintaining their own traditional culture. The efforts by Christian missionaries to 'civilize' the Cherokee people are also discussed and the matrilineal structure and child raising practices of Cherokee society.
Source:
North Carolina Historical Review (NoCar F251 .N892), Vol. 87 Issue 4, Oct 2010, p403-430 , il, por, map, f Periodical Website
Record #:
22534
Author(s):
Abstract:
The little community of Texana, a multi-ethnic community of whites, African Americans, and a few with Cherokee ancestry, was almost completely self-sufficient. Texana is located near the Cherokee town of Murphy, NC and is named for its founder, Texana McClelland, an African American woman who settled there in the 1850s.
Record #:
25106
Abstract:
In 1830, President Andrew Jackson signed the Indian Removal Act into law, allowing the government to force many American Indians to leave their home lands. Some Cherokee tribes remained in North Carolina and became known as the Eastern Band of the Cherokee Nation. Today, they run schools in Cherokee, North Carolina and preserve their culture through the buildings, education, and community on campus.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 55 Issue 2, Spring 2016, p8-9, il, por
Record #:
29109
Author(s):
Abstract:
The parallels between cultures of American Indians groups and native Asian peoples are highlighted through shared religious mythology and related linguistic patterns. The importance of the serpent and turtle as symbols in both cultures are discussed in depth along with the Flood myth or archetype. Also discussed are the consonant sounds present in the words water and serpent and their presence in the languages of Asiatic peoples and American Indians. One group highlighted in connection to the Asiatic cultures is the Cherokee of the Eastern United States.
Record #:
29107
Abstract:
An account of the archeological excavation of the Lower Cherokee settlement of Estatoe is provided. Maps show the location of the settlement. Illustrations and photographs show the excavation of dwellings and their floor plans. Photographs of Lamar pottery types and clay pipes are also provided along with tables of inventories of Indian and historic materials found at the site. Estatoe’s contribution to the understanding of Cherokee history and archaeology are noted.
Record #:
36351
Abstract:
Sculptor Peter Toth gifted each of the 50 states and Canada Native American wooden statues in memorial of the Trail of Tears. Although not Native American, Toth felt compelled to honor the plight of the Cherokee and also used the statues as a way to remember his own family’s journey to America.