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9 results for Sculptors
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Record #:
5943
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Williams discusses the life and work of sculptor R. K. Harniman. Harniman has just completed carving a statue of Sir Walter Raleigh from a cypress tree. This particular tree was located in the Tar River swamp twelve miles west of Greenville and began growing in the year 1467, eighty-seven years before Raleigh was born. Harniman carved the statue in Raleigh.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 3 Issue 2, May/June 1975, p26-27, 29, 31, il
Record #:
6704
Author(s):
Abstract:
Virginia Dare was the first English child born in the New World. Visitors to the Elizabethan Gardens in Manteo have seen the statue depicting her as an adult, but few know the remarkable journey it took to get there. Jackson chronicles how the statue was sculpted in Italy in the 1850s by Maria Lander of Massachusetts; went down in a shipwreck off the Spanish coast; survived a fire in a New York studio; alarmed North Carolinians when the semi-nude figure appeared in front of the Capitol building; and finally came to the vicinity of Dare's birth.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 1, June 2004, p138-139, 141, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7177
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North Carolina native Patrick Dougherty is part of a widening group of artists whose creations are made solely from nature. He creates large-scale sculptures out of entwined wood that remains bound together without nails, screws, and glue. Stuber discusses Dougherty's work and latest creations that stand in the North Carolina Museum of Art's 100-acre park.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 22 Issue 11, Mar 2005, p32-33, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7377
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The annual Sculpture Competition is held in September in J.E. Broyhill Park in Lenoir in Caldwell County. This year marks the 20th anniversary of the competition, and over 100 sculptors are expected to enter their work. Works of all types are included, varying in size from one foot to 15 feet and in materials from polished wood to duct tape. Everyone from nationally recognized artists to college students competes for coveted merit awards or purchase of their creations.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 4, Sept 2005, p182-184, 186, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
27014
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Patrick Dougherty makes sculpture out of saplings by weaving the wood of sprawling circular forms, which support themselves and then grow outward. His art is site-specific, meaning that he builds his sculpture with a particular space in mind, and the space itself helps determine what the resulting sculpture will look like. His latest exhibit, Shelters of Transition, is on display at the North Carolina Museum of Art in Raleigh.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 7 Issue 4, Feb 23-Mar 8 1989, p18, il Periodical Website
Record #:
28833
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Abstract:
The North Carolina Museum of Art opens a new park on November 6, 2016. The park will feature sculptures and two speech-bubble-shaped benches by the conceptual artist Hank Willis Thomas. Thomas’s work examines race, identity, representation, and commerce, and seeks to broaden community engagement.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 42, Nov 2016, p27-28, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
29566
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North Carolina sculptor Patrick Dougherty, also known as the Stickman, creates whimsical sculptures comprised of tree saplings, branches, twigs and vines. Over the past thirty years, he has built hundreds of these works in public, and become internationally acclaimed. His latest work will be constructed at Durham’s Sarah P. Duke Gardens.
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Record #:
32679
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One of possibly only a dozen individuals in the country with the same profession, Howard Ted Conibear is a sand sculptor. While his wife and two children keep the house in Hendersonville, Conibear travels the country sculpting his life-sized figures.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 15, Sep 1946, p3-4, 21, por
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Record #:
36351
Abstract:
Sculptor Peter Toth gifted each of the 50 states and Canada Native American wooden statues in memorial of the Trail of Tears. Although not Native American, Toth felt compelled to honor the plight of the Cherokee and also used the statues as a way to remember his own family’s journey to America.