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7 results for Monuments
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Record #:
5955
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Abstract:
North Carolina history is remembered across the state through historical markers, statues, and plaques. Williams discusses a number of monuments, including those remembering U.S. Presidents from North Carolina, Civil War governor Zebulon Vance, and the \"Greensboro Four,\" who launched the state's civil rights movement.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 4, Sept 2003, p158-162, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
22765
Abstract:
North Carolina has rich African American history, but only after the Civil Rights Movement did local and state monuments begin to publicly commemorate this history. Architectural historian, Catherine Bishir, identifies many important African American monuments in the state and explains that the time-period during which they were constructed can tell us much about the state's past.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
25380
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ECU artists Hanna Jubran and Jodi Hollnagel are working on a monument for the Aycock Brown Welcome Center in Kitty Hawk. The monument has been sponsored by many corporations features 14 stainless steel pylons.
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Record #:
22561
Abstract:
An iron marker now sits at the site of the Confederate Navy Yard in Charlotte, North Carolina. The Navy Yard operated from spring of 1862 until 1865. Commanded by first by General R.L. Page and later by H. Ashton Ramsay, a number of large structures were erected on site, including a gun carriage shop, a laboratory, a torpedo shop, a forge where propeller shafting was forged for all the Confederate ironclads. Rifles, shot, shells, and torpedoes were also manufactured at the Navy Yard in Charlotte.
Record #:
29598
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1938 Masonic Marker is located seventeen miles from Waynesville, North Carolina at the Balsam Gap Camp entrance to Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The marker is a monument featuring over six-hundred stones and minerals collected from other shrines, including Plymouth Rock, an Egyptian pyramid, and the White House.
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Record #:
36582
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Abstract:
Also known as “dragon lines” or “fairy lines,” ley lines lie around many of the world’s wonders, such as the Pyramids of Giza. Asheville, falling within ley lines, is believed to have the power arising from high frequency vibrations in strong magnetic fields. Recent research draws the same conclusion as ancient civilizations: ley lines impact fertility, agriculture, mood, memory, and perception for humans and animals alike.
Record #:
36351
Abstract:
Sculptor Peter Toth gifted each of the 50 states and Canada Native American wooden statues in memorial of the Trail of Tears. Although not Native American, Toth felt compelled to honor the plight of the Cherokee and also used the statues as a way to remember his own family’s journey to America.