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8 results for Masons--North Carolina
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Record #:
15227
Author(s):
Abstract:
John Huske Anderson, of Raleigh, next week will be elevated to the rank of the highest Masonic office in the United States, Grand Master. Anderson will thus have the highest office ever attained by a North Carolina Mason.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 7 Issue 21, Oct 1939, p1, 26, 28, f
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Record #:
17104
Author(s):
Abstract:
Stones, weighing from two ounces to 400 pounds, will be used in making the Masonic marker to be unveiled on July 11th at the Black Camp entrance of the Great Smokey Mountain National Park at Waynesville. The marker will stand on the spot where the North Carolina Grand Council of York Rite Masons buried a memorial chest July 5th, 1937. The chest will be opened in 1972, the 150th anniversary of the founding of the Grand Council of North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 6 Issue 5, July 1938, p7
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Record #:
22517
Abstract:
Colonel Hardy Murfree of Hertford County fought in the American Revolution and lived both near Murfreesboro, NC and Murfreesboro, TN, the latter having been named for him. He was buried with full Masonic honors.
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Record #:
22556
Abstract:
There have been four Grand Masters of the Grand Lodge, St. John's Lodge with Grand Jurisdiction of North Carolina. From 1791 to 1811, John Louis Taylor served as Grand Master for three terms, later attaining fame as a lawyer and Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. Following Richard Dobbs Spaight's retirement in 1832, it was not until 1850 that Alonzo T. Jerkins, prominently connected in industry, finance, and transportation, became Grand Master. Following Jerkins three consecutive terms as Grand Master, Charles Cauthen Clark, a native of New Bern and member of Congress, was elected Grand Master in 1870.
Record #:
29598
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1938 Masonic Marker is located seventeen miles from Waynesville, North Carolina at the Balsam Gap Camp entrance to Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The marker is a monument featuring over six-hundred stones and minerals collected from other shrines, including Plymouth Rock, an Egyptian pyramid, and the White House.
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Record #:
34494
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1993, the Order of the Eastern Star, an auxiliary Masonry branch, celebrated their 50th anniversary in North Carolina. The Beaufort and Morehead City chapters, established in 1943, remain active in the community through their support of a local senior center, and Shriners Hospitals. The article also discusses founding members and current group aims.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 9 Issue 3, Summer 1993, p9-10, il, por
Record #:
35821
Author(s):
Abstract:
Stonework experienced a renaissance in counties like Orange and Macon. The comeback had come from masons Steve Magers, Lyn Walters, Suzanna Stewart, and Tom and Joe Kenlan. Their chimneys were featured as an illustration of stonemasonry at its most creative.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 1, Feb 1980, p44-45
Record #:
35992
Abstract:
A true down homer was about more than just being born in a local town or having one’s name affiliated with a local building. What made Charlie Gray Sr. so included turning down job offers after graduation from North Carolina State College, so he could own a local grocery store. Being a down homer was also reflected in his promotion of education for the area. During his almost fifty year career as a school principal and teacher, he professed a hope for Hatteras Island to have a central accredited high school.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 3, July 1976, p72-77