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11 results for Cherokee Indians--North Carolina--History
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Record #:
17382
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Abstract:
Mr. Foght served as the Superintendent of Cherokee Indians within state government. He reported on the tribe's history, drawing attention to the political and cultural achievements of the once great Native American nation. This is part one of two in Mr. Foght's article about the Cherokee.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 3 Issue 4, Jan 1936, p7-8, por
Record #:
19607
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the colonial period, the French and English competed for the favor of several Indian tribes. One of the most powerful of the Southern tribes, the Cherokee were known for selling furs of great value and were strategically located in upper South Carolina and Georgia, the heart of the western North Carolina Mountains, and in southwestern Tennessee. The Cherokee were sought as allies by both the French and the English and the rivalry between the two for the active aid of this tribe was at its height during of the French and Indian War.
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Record #:
19666
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Abstract:
The New Echota Treaty of 1835 requested that the Cherokee people cede all of their land east of the Mississippi River in return for lands in the west, reimbursement for any land improvements, as well as one year of government subsistence less any debts. This article examines the circumstances surrounding the creation and execution of the treaty.
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Record #:
22768
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Abstract:
Kituwah, located in the Tuckaseegee River valley in western North Carolina, is a sacred place of great religious importance to Cherokee Indians. In the early 1820s, the Cherokees lost Kituwah to the United States government, but in 1996, they had the opportunity to reacquire the town. Today, the site celebrates traditional and current Cherokee culture as well as the town's history.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 54 Issue 1, Fall 2014, p28-29, il
Record #:
24708
Author(s):
Abstract:
A recreated 200-year-old Oconaluftee Indian Village recently opened in Cherokee at the foot of the Smokies to educate tourists about the ways Cherokees lived. The project is part of the Cherokee Historical Association’s program to perpetuate the history of the Cherokees.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 49, May 1953, p12-14, il
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Record #:
24802
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Abstract:
In the summer of 1946, Franklin, North Carolina residents came together to save the sacred Cherokee “Mother Town” of Nikwasi, located in Franklin. History student, Nathaniel F. Holly agrues that although the Franklinites relied on their ideas of the “vanishing Indian” as support for their cause, ultimately, their efforts assisted with the disappearance of these Amerindians. However, the Cherokee Indians never disappeared from the Franklin area and their presence now forces Franklinites to consider the irony of this preservation effort.
Record #:
29104
Author(s):
Abstract:
A fragment of the Cherokee migration story presented to Alexander Long in 1717 is provided and then analyzed. The story’s explanation of the Cherokee migration seems unlikely from a contemporary perspective because of claims about their ancient writing system, their diet, and a migration pattern from east to west. All of these seem unlikely for various reasons, but the author focuses on the migration pattern. However, when considered the geography in the tale from a different perspective, this could be an account of an Indian crossing from Northeast Asia into northwestern North America.
Record #:
29102
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author attempts to explain Judaculla Rock and its petroglyphs. The rock is believed to be of Cherokee origin and is located in Cullowhee, Jackson County, North Carolina. An explanation of the mythical Cherokee character Judaculla or Tsul-ka-lu is first described. The author then follows by explaining that he believes the rock is a picture-map of the battle of Tal-i-wa fought in 1755. Evidence for his theory is provided.
Record #:
31597
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Cherokee became of interest to the British as they were in key positions to help halt the push of the Spanish up from Florida. This article tracks their relationship with the State of North Carolina since that time.
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Record #:
31713
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Abstract:
When the Cherokees were forced to relocate to Oklahoma in 1838, several hundred refused to leave and fled into the Smoky Mountains. Today there are about three-thousand Cherokees living in western North Carolina. This article discusses the history of Cherokee Nation, the Trail of Tears, and the Sacred Fire ritual.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 5 Issue 11, Nov 1973, p20-21, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
34280
Author(s):
Abstract:
For the Qualla Cherokee Indians, the western mountains of North Carolina are sacred and eternal, but surviving and prospering here has been a challenge of generations. Known as the “Land of Blue Smoke,” the sovereign nation encompasses parts of Jackson and Swain counties at the eastern gateway to Great Smoky Mountains National Park. This article covers the history of the Cherokee, their achievements, and their sacrifices.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 12, May 2018, p62-68, il, por Periodical Website
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