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8 results for Cherokee Indians--North Carolina--Social life and customs
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Record #:
8096
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Cherokee Indians of the Southeastern states lost many of their tribal traditions during the turbulent years surrounding the Trail of Tears in 1838, when most of them were rounded up by United States Army soldiers and forced to go to new lands in Oklahoma. Some members of the tribe, the ancestors of today's Eastern Band of Cherokee, escaped and took refuge in the North Carolina mountains. Today the Eastern Band numbers over 13,000 Cherokee who live on the 56,000-acre Qualla Boundary Reservation. Wright discusses tribal elders' efforts to preserve the history and traditions of the Cherokee.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 64 Issue 9, Sept 2006, p43, il
Record #:
14167
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mrs. Russell D. Hold reminisces about her experiences living on a Cherokee reservation from 1907 to 1926.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 17 Issue 30, Dec 1949, p10, 24, f
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Record #:
14180
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lt. Henry Timberlake, a British Army officer who visited western North Carolina and eastern Tennessee in 1762, left a description of the general appearance, habits, and customs of the Cherokees.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 17 Issue 36, Feb 1950, p11, 22, f
Full Text:
Record #:
14987
Abstract:
The early Cherokees of North Carolina had an interesting life with specific habits and customs such as rules to hunting certain animals, farming ceremonies for certain crops, and the use of certain woods for beautiful carvings.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 10 Issue 34, Jan 1943, p11, 30
Full Text:
Record #:
15708
Author(s):
Abstract:
Pleasants examines the status of today's Cherokees, who live on their reservation in Western North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 5, July 1954, p10-12, il
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Record #:
18688
Author(s):
Abstract:
Corkran presents a reproduction of Alexander Long's original postscript concerning the manners and customs of the Cherokees Indians of the southeastern United States.
Full Text:
Record #:
16209
Abstract:
The Cherokee repurchased Kituhwa Mound in 1997 because legend says it was the first village over 1,000 years ago. Today, visitors can visit and see the traditional warrior dance of the AniKituhwagi, people of Kituhwa.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 49 Issue 1, Fall 2009, p24-26, il
Record #:
31713
Author(s):
Abstract:
When the Cherokees were forced to relocate to Oklahoma in 1838, several hundred refused to leave and fled into the Smoky Mountains. Today there are about three-thousand Cherokees living in western North Carolina. This article discusses the history of Cherokee Nation, the Trail of Tears, and the Sacred Fire ritual.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 5 Issue 11, Nov 1973, p20-21, il, por Periodical Website