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18 results for Native Americans--North Carolina
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Record #:
19395
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Abstract:
The author proposes a curriculum to teach eighth grade social studies students to the states Native American populations. To inform students about this topic, the lesson plans are structured around cultural geography lessons as an introduction to Native American history. There are three objectives for this course: identify Carolina Native American populations, describe Native American influence on colonial life, and analyze demographics and their impact on the state's society and economy.
Source:
North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 13 Issue , 2005, p86-103, il
Record #:
21198
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article examines the ways in which Native Americans have directly shaped North Carolina history focusing on four distinct roles that they have played: Native Americans as independent nations, as defeated adversaries, as invisible men, and as emerging communities.
Record #:
23282
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Raven Street Dance Studio in Hollister teaches Native American dance to keep traditions alive and preserve cultural heritage.
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Record #:
24802
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Abstract:
In the summer of 1946, Franklin, North Carolina residents came together to save the sacred Cherokee “Mother Town” of Nikwasi, located in Franklin. History student, Nathaniel F. Holly agrues that although the Franklinites relied on their ideas of the “vanishing Indian” as support for their cause, ultimately, their efforts assisted with the disappearance of these Amerindians. However, the Cherokee Indians never disappeared from the Franklin area and their presence now forces Franklinites to consider the irony of this preservation effort.
Record #:
25374
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Forrest Croce has created a photo expose of the East Carolina Native American Organization’s tenth annual campus powwow.
Record #:
26247
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Abstract:
UNC archaeologists are excavating several Piedmont sites along the Dan River, and studying the impact European colonists had on the established native settlements. These sites were occupied by Siouan Indians until they became in contact with European traders.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 6 Issue 4, Summer 1989, p5-7, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
22699
Author(s):
Abstract:
The brief Chowan River War which raged on the Virginia-North Carolina border from 1676-1677 had direct connections to both Bacon's Rebellion and Culpepper's rebellion. Despite the factionalism rampant among the English settlers, the power of the Chowanoke Indians in the area was broken.
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Record #:
27528
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Abstract:
The Hardaway Site is one of North Carolina’s greatest archaeological repositories. Located in the Uwharrie Mountains, the site has yielded a plethora of arrowheads, including Palmer, Kirk, and Stanly points. These artifacts help indicate how Native Americans lived in the region 12,000 years ago.
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Record #:
27529
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Hardaway Site is one of North Carolina’s greatest archaeological repositories. Located in the Uwharrie Mountains, the site has yielded a plethora of arrowheads, including Palmer, Kirk, and Stanly points. These artifacts provide insight into Native American hunting practices 12,000 years ago.
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Record #:
28864
Abstract:
The State of North Carolina declared 1986 the Year of the Native American. The purpose is to educate citizens about their Indian heritage and the role Indians have played in the state’s history. Festivals, symposia, exhibits, concerts and commemorations will mark the entire year.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 2 Issue 3, May 1986, p3, il
Record #:
29911
Author(s):
Abstract:
Home Land is a new exhibit at the Asheville Art Museum honoring Native American art, culture and history. Most pieces were provided by collector Lambert Wilson and Eastern Band Cherokee artist Shan Goshorn. Goshorn also provided letters and narratives pertaining to the Trail of Tears and centuries-old medicine stories.
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Record #:
30586
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina is the home to a large population of Native Americans, 4000 who make up the Eastern Band of the Cherokees. Cherokee, the largest community on the Reservation, serves as the administrative head and also presents a unique opportunity to study the history and present-day life of the Cherokees.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 13 Issue 10, March 1956, p8-9, 25, por, bibl
Record #:
31536
Author(s):
Abstract:
Indians were the original Tar Heels, for their roots in North Carolina go back hundreds of years before the territory was claimed by European settlers. In recognition of that history, Governor James B. Hunt, Jr. has proclaimed September 20-26 as Indian Heritage Week in North Carolina. From the Cherokee Reservation in the west to the Waccamaw-Siouan tribal area in the southeast section of the state, statewide observances will celebrate the history and contributions of North Carolina Indians with various events and festivities.
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Record #:
34448
Abstract:
Over the course of the 18th century, the native North Carolina Chowan population adopted European practices and sold their allocated reservation lands to conform and survive in the British colony. These actions led to their reclassification from “Indians” to “Colored People” by colonial officials, who also assumed there was a loss of cultural identity. Contemporary writers incorrectly believed the Chowans no longer existed as a political or cultural entity, however an examination of archival and oral histories indicates that the Chowan people have maintained their cultural identity. Furthermore, their colonial racial reclassification is indicative of attitudes towards race and identity formation in the 18th century.
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Record #:
34486
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Abstract:
This article presents a general historic overview of Hog Island, 1585-1711. Laughton discusses the island’s 16th century inhabitants, the Neusiok, and associated archaeological sites and historic records. While several historic shell mounds have been destroyed, other archaeological evidence continues to offer insight into the past. The historic record, on the other hand, details very little about Neusiok lifeways or political structure.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 8 Issue 4, Fall 1992, p16-21, il, por, map