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10 results for Indians of North America--North Carolina
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Record #:
12073
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Abstract:
Visited by John Lawson during his travels throughout North Carolina in the 1730s, Keyauwee Town, a palisaded Native American village, was re-discovered by Douglas Rights of Winston-Salem in the 1920s.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 24 Issue 4, July 1956, p12-13, il
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Record #:
12574
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Abstract:
Native Americans of Cherokee decent are undergoing profound changes within North Carolina. An increase in employment off the reservation, coupled with the strengthening of industry on the reservation, is resulting in the decline of Native Americans being able to speak in their native tongue or write using the traditional alphabet. Modernization and exposure to life outside of the reservation is leading to an intensification of interracial marriages, or rather, individuals claiming to have Cherokee blood, thus entitling them to a share in the ownership of the reservation. In an attempt to curb the rising number of individuals professing Cherokee heritage, it is now required that individuals be at least 1/16th true Cherokee prior to acceptance into the Eastern Band.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 34 Issue 8, Sept 1966, p9-11, 35-36, il, por
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Record #:
12805
Abstract:
Approximately five miles east of Mt. Gilead stands a modest museum containing artifacts from a Native American settlement, believed to be inhabited prior to or during the fifteenth century. The settlement, containing hearth remains, earthen mounds and burial plots, probably served some 1,500 to 2,000 residents.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 28 Issue 7, Sept 1960, p9, 31, il
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Record #:
13741
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Thirty thousand people in Robeson County will soon decide what their official name should be. Of course, they do have a name, but a large group of the people considers it misleading, inappropriate, and inaccurate. Are the Indians of Robeson County Cherokees, Siouan, Croatans, or Lumbee?
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 35, Jan 1952, p6-7, 14, f
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Record #:
14001
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The request for a change in the tribal name of these Indians is a reminder that their origin is still as much of a mystery as it has been throughout the years.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 18 Issue 47, Apr 1951, p3, 22
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Record #:
14087
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Abstract:
Wilson considers North Carolina's rich Native American heritage by examining examples of pipes. Effigy pipes are highly decorative artifacts typically representing animals. Notable pipes found in North Carolina are collected in the United States Museum collection. Several examples from Cherokee tribes demonstrate the skill and craftsmanship to make these sometimes elaborate pipes.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 16 Issue 5, July 1948, p8, il
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Record #:
25810
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Abstract:
Archaeologists Brett Riggs and Stephen Davis recently discovered Nassaw, the central town of the Catawba tribe, and are looking deeper into the decline of American Indians. Medical student Anthony Fleg started the Native Health Intitiative, which sends student volunteers to Indian communities to learn about tribes and collaborate on health and education issues.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 24 Issue 2, Winter 2008, p33-37, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
28856
Abstract:
Since the English settlers first came into contact with the native people of North Carolina, there has been constant pressure on the native customs and traditions, causing many to disappear completely and others to fall into virtual disuse. To counter threats to their culture, many Indian people began to re-learn the old ways of doing things and borrowing other cultural traditions.
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NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 1 Issue 3, March 1985, p6, il
Record #:
30586
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina is the home to a large population of Native Americans, 4000 who make up the Eastern Band of the Cherokees. Cherokee, the largest community on the Reservation, serves as the administrative head and also presents a unique opportunity to study the history and present-day life of the Cherokees.
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We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 13 Issue 10, March 1956, p8-9, 25, por, bibl
Record #:
31536
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Abstract:
Indians were the original Tar Heels, for their roots in North Carolina go back hundreds of years before the territory was claimed by European settlers. In recognition of that history, Governor James B. Hunt, Jr. has proclaimed September 20-26 as Indian Heritage Week in North Carolina. From the Cherokee Reservation in the west to the Waccamaw-Siouan tribal area in the southeast section of the state, statewide observances will celebrate the history and contributions of North Carolina Indians with various events and festivities.
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