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152 results for University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill--Research
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Record #:
1291
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The Civil War and the period from 1871 to 1875, when the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill closed its doors, shattered the classical curriculum of the antebellum years. Subsequent developments inaugurated the modern research university.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 11 Issue 1, Dec 1993, p10-12, por Periodical Website
Record #:
2252
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A joint experiment, the Hoechst Celanese Corporation & University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Research Partnership is applying total quality management principles to research projects that, it is hoped, will be mutually beneficial.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 12 Issue 1, Nov 1994, p6-10, il Periodical Website
Record #:
25494
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Alicia Mullis, a UNC undergraduate student, studied how music can treat chronic pain. Her research suggested that playing music helps to train our brains to not focus on pain.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 28 Issue 1, Fall 2011, p20-21, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25501
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Patricia Gensel is a UNC professor of biology and studies plant fossils. Scientists have traditionally believed that plants began to develop wood for structural support during the Devonian period. After studying the world’s oldest wood samples, Gensel is convinced that the plant adaptation is related more to water use and storage than to support.
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25538
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UNC chemists Vyas Sharma and David Lawrence were funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to diagnose diseases in remote African villages by having people spit on seeds. They hope to turn seeds into a cheap, transportable diagnostic kit by tricking seeds into germinating only when they come into contact with an infected patient’s saliva.
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25537
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Frank Baumgartner, a UNC political scientist, studied lobbyists, interest group advocates, and government officials who worked to change policy or preserve the status quo between 1999 and 2002. After six years of research, Baumgartner found that money was not the determining factor in policy outcomes. Rather, it was the accumulation of bias and influential power already in the political system.
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Record #:
25543
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UNC researchers Mark Norris and Sheila Kannappan are analyzing the Hubble Space Telescope archives to compare the ages of dwarfs and their host galaxies. If they are both of the same age, then the dwarfs are probably giant globular clusters; if they are of different ages, then the dwarf was probably born as a galaxy and later pulled into another orbit.
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Record #:
25545
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UNC historian Kathryn Burns has been analyzing the city archives of Cuzco, Peru since 1990. Burns discovered that many of the archives are missing because documents were occasionally sold or covered up by the colonial power system.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 27 Issue 3, Spring 2011, p20-23, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25549
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UNC researchers are working on a model to understand the relationship between wildlife conservation interventions, societal responses, and positive outcomes. They hope their research can help inform decisions that balance conservation efforts and the livelihoods of the Masai villagers in the Serengeti.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 27 Issue 3, Spring 2011, p38-43, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25557
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UNC mathematics professor Peter Mucha studies networks in attempt to quantify relationships between nodes. Mucha has used network analysis to study connections in Congress, currency exchange rates, and the Bowl Championship Series.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 27 Issue 1, Fall 2010, p33-35, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
25659
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Ty Hendrick, a UNC assistant professor of biology, studies flight principles based on birds and hawkmoths. Hendrick and his lab are specifically interested in understanding how animals use their wings to turn around when they are upright in the air.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 26 Issue 1, Fall 2009, p21-23, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25677
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UNC professor Jordynn Jack studied the ethics and scientific rhetoric used by mea and women working on the Manhattan Project. Jack found there was a difference between some of the scientists who seemed to be good at persuading and others who were not. Scientists who argued in terms of safety were less effective than those who argued in terms of what would move the project forward.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 26 Issue 3, Spring 2010, p18-21, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25679
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Lara Wagner is the first seismologist to use broadband seismometers in the Appalachian Mountains to explore the structure of the lithosphere. Her findings show that the crust underneath the Appalachians is thick, and indicate the mountains are not eroding nearly as fast as scientists have thought.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 26 Issue 3, Spring 2010, p26-29, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25724
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Urban planner Thomas Campanella has documented the urban transformation in China since the early 1990s. Rapid modernization results from the desire for a better quality of life, but has consequences of air pollution, health problems, and exploitation of rural migrants. According to Robin Visser, who studies Chinese culture, there is a growing movement toward sustainable development.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 25 Issue 1, Fall 2008, p34-38, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25723
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Political scientist Mark Crescenzi studies conflict by examining events over time and identifying patterns that lead to confrontation. He developed the Interstate Interaction Model to predict future conflict and to better understand how to improve relations between countries.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 25 Issue 1, Fall 2008, p32-33, il Periodical Website
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