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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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18 results for Astronomy
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Record #:
15868
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Every 20 minutes on most nights in the 1950s, two telescopes in the New Mexico desert took pictures of the sky. When the Harvard-Smithsonian Meteor Study shoot ended in the late 1950s, thousands of pictures had documented that wedge of the universe. More than 40 years later, North Carolina astronomers Bob Hayward and Mike Castelaz of the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI) began examining the 40,000 images and found unexpected novae.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 29 Issue 3, Jan 2012, p5, 7, 9, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
15944
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Astronomers from the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute are studying photographs taken from two New Mexico telescopes. Photographs taken as part of the Harvard-Smithsonian Meteor Study remained in New Mexico archives until North Carolinian scientists Bob Hayward and Mike Castelaz began looking at some of the 40,000 images. Already, after viewing just the first hundred photos, the men discovered documentation of an exploding star, a rare sight to be caught on film.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 29 Issue 3, Jan 2012, p5-9, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
22438
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Astronomy enthusiasts in Guilford County are supported by two important institutions: the Cline Observatory is located at Guilford Technical Community College and the Greensboro Astronomy Club. Founded in 1948, the latter is one of the state's oldest astronomy clubs.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 1, Jun 2014, p38, 40-41, il Periodical Website
Record #:
25543
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UNC researchers Mark Norris and Sheila Kannappan are analyzing the Hubble Space Telescope archives to compare the ages of dwarfs and their host galaxies. If they are both of the same age, then the dwarfs are probably giant globular clusters; if they are of different ages, then the dwarf was probably born as a galaxy and later pulled into another orbit.
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Record #:
25818
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Cosmologist Laura Mersini-Houghton used a model that assumes the existence of a parallel universe to predict a giant void in space before it was observed by other scientists. The void was inconsistent with standard cosmological theory, but has led to new possibilities in research.
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Record #:
25907
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UNC astronomers have spent the last eighteen years developing a high-tech telescope called SOAR. They recently launched SOAR into the skies above the Chilean Andes, where it will capture the highest quality images of any observatory in the world. SOAR is the most versatile and efficient telescope of its kind, and makes UNC a key player on the global astronomical scene.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 21 Issue 1, Fall 2004, p12-19, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26046
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The Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) is one of the largest university-based nuclear physics labs in the nation. Tom Clegg, professor of physics and astronomy, trains students to build ion equipment and run experiments to learn how dark energy affects galaxy evolution.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 19 Issue 3, Spring 2003, p10-15, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26226
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SNR0540-69.3 is the name of the nebulous remains of a supernova explosion. Jeff Knerr and Jon Morse, doctoral candidates in the Department of Physics and Astronomy, have created a computer simulation to study the underlying physics of supernova explosions.
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Record #:
26235
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UNC astronomer Bruce Carney and his colleagues have established that the Milky Way Galaxy is at least 18 billion years old. To arrive at their estimate, the group studied several nearby stars called RR Lyrae variable stars.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 6 Issue 1, Fall 1988, p15-17, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
29905
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Bare Dark Sky Observatory is a new Certified Star Park in Burnsville, North Carolina. This is the first such certification to be given in the southeastern United States, and one of only fifteen in the world. The observatory features the largest telescope in the region, and offers a pitch-dark atmosphere to ensure an optimum star-gazing opportunity.
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Record #:
29904
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The Great American Solar Eclipse will be visible in North Carolina on the afternoon of August 21. Astronomers at the University of North Carolina at Asheville explain how the total solar eclipse occurs, and the history of astronomical theories. The best places to view the eclipse are in the western region of the state, and numerous towns are hosting viewing events.
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Record #:
35387
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Included in Rachel L. Smith’s companion article to “Comet Landing Makes History” was an article that offered new information about how planets form. What lent this new information was the discovery during the Rosetta Mission of HL Taurus, a protoplanetary system. Profiled also of Dr. Smith called “HL Tau” were the telescope used, the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), and H-Tau’s features, such as unusual oxygen chemistry.
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Record #:
35386
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Scientists landing on a comet will have implications beyond advancing the study of the solar system, according to the author. Included in Dr. Rachel L. Smith’s discussion of her study, led by the European Space Agency, were Philae, who lent humans a robotic hand in the crew’s discoveries, and findings from the Rosetta Mission.
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Record #:
35761
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On Axel Heiberg Island, adventure was found for the author in ways that went beyond being part of a team collecting samples for astrobiological research. It was found in adjusting to the absence of modern conveniences easily taken for granted, such as comfortable indoor plumbing. It was also found in realizing that “habitable” becomes redefined by habituating in the North Pole.
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Record #:
36968
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Profile was that year’s solar eclipse, a total solar eclipse in history touted as viewable in towns such as Franklin, Sylva, and Highlands. Included in the profile were other contributions that western North Carolina has made to the field of astronomy. In the early 1960s, NASA established a satellite tracking station in Transylvania County, now called the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute. That institute became a site of research for this eclipse.
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