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48 results for Spivey, Angela
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Record #:
2720
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Established in 1963, the Institute of Outdoor Drama at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill shows communities how to attract tourists through local history dramatizations.
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4174
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Nonnative plants and animals are gaining a foothold in the state and threaten the environment. Some were purposefully introduced, while others arrived on their own. For example, purple loosestrife was introduced as an ornamental in the 1800s. In wetlands, though, loosestrife crowds out other plants and can affect nearby duck populations because its seeds are not a good food source. While some nonnative plants are good, such as corn and soybeans, others can, without their normal pests and climate limitations, grow out of control.
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Record #:
7250
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Author Sarah Dessen talks about how her interest in writing developed and her published work. At age thirty she has written four novels and teaches undergraduates at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her books, which deal with young adults, have won best book awards from the American Library Association and the School Library Journal.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 17 Issue 2, Winter 2001, p22-23, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25827
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Jane Brown, professor of journalism and mass communication, led a project interviewing teenagers about their sexual attitudes and behaviors. Results suggest that the media is how adolescents receive sex education. Brown encourages parents to be open and talk with their kids early about sexual content.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 23 Issue 1, Fall 2006, p11-13, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
25894
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The highest number of hurricanes has occurred in coastal North Carolina, making the state extremely vulnerable to flooding and other disastrous impacts. UNC researchers are conducting studies to learn about community evacuation decisions and disaster response, and to develop models that predict storm surge and ecological changes resulting from hurricanes.
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25896
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Richard Weisler, an adjunct professor of psychiatry, mapped the locations of cancer deaths and suicides and found they were within proximity to asphalt plants in Salisbury, North Carolina. Hydrogen sulfide, a chemical emitted from asphalt plants, is suspected to affect mood and responses to stress.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 22 Issue 2, Winter 2006, p21-24, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25906
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Al Banes, professor of orthopedics and biomedical engineering, leads a research team aiming to develop bioartificial tendons. Their study suggests a possible new clinical use for anabolic steroids to help increase healing and regeneration after surgeries such as rotator cuff repairs.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 21 Issue 1, Fall 2004, p12-13, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25912
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Breast cancer advocates are changing how research gets done by lobbying for increased funding, helping decide what gets funded, and even evaluating research products such as drugs. New research directions at UNC include the Specialized Programs in Research Excellence, which unites researchers, clinicians, and patients in advancing breast cancer studies.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 21 Issue 2, Winter 2005, p20-23, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25909
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Biochemist Jack Griffith developed techniques that let scientists see the finer details of DNA, and created the first electron microscope images of chromosomes. His lab recently used electron microscopy to map the DNA involved in Fragile X syndrome, a developmental disorder.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 21 Issue 1, Fall 2004, p31-32, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25918
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Researchers affiliated with UNC’s Laboratories for Reproductive Biology are working on a vaccine that could serve as birth control for men. They discovered a protein critical to movement of sperm cells. Targeting the protein could stop sperm from making it to the female reproductive tract.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 21 Issue 3, Spring 2005, p23-25, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25919
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UNC researchers completed the first study to link a genetic variation with a chronic pain disorder. They found that women who had tiny variations in the COMT gene were more sensitive to pain then men.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 21 Issue 3, Spring 2005, p30-32, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26011
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The Asheville Project began to help patients manage their diabetes, and to give pharmacists opportunities to have more meaningful practices. The project has since expanded to include high cholesterol, high blood pressure, and asthma on a national level.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 20 Issue 2, Winter 2004, p31-32, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26007
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With the help of an RNA test, UNC doctors uncovered signs of an outbreak that could easily have gone unnoticed. Two North Carolina college students were diagnosed with an acute HIV infection, which could have turned into a public health threat.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 20 Issue 2, Winter 2004, p16-19, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26023
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Researchers devised a new theory about how some autoimmune diseases work. Contrary to previous beliefs, autoimmunity is suspected to be triggered by antisense proteins. The theory is that genetic makeup and other factors come together to cause autoimmune diseases.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 20 Issue 3, Spring 2004, p27-32, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26018
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Professors of pathology and laboratory medicine at UNC Chapel Hill and East Carolina University are developing freeze-dried blood platelets. Once rehydrated, the platelets could help army medics to stop internal bleeding.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 20 Issue 3, Spring 2004, p9-11, il, por Periodical Website
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