NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


32 results for Tourist trade
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 3
Next
Record #:
575
Author(s):
Abstract:
Steeped in a history tied to the sea, Carteret County is ready to set sail toward a new destiny characterized by international trade and a booming tourism industry.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 6, June 1991, p22-39, il
Record #:
579
Author(s):
Abstract:
Expectations were high that a booming travel and tourism industry on the coast would result from the completion of the final link of I-40 last year, but experience to date is tempering that euphoria.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 5, May 1991, p30-38, il
Record #:
576
Author(s):
Abstract:
Worried that neighboring states are doing a better job of attracting tourists, North Carolina's tourism industry marshals its forces behind legislative initiatives and a new marketing scheme.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 8, Aug 1991, p16-20, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
598
Author(s):
Abstract:
The tourism economy in North Carolina has increased by an average of 10% each year for nearly a decade.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 48 Issue 5, May 1990, p14-24, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
663
Author(s):
Abstract:
A unique combination of resources, geography and climate ensures that North Carolina's travel and tourism industry is always growing.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
750
Author(s):
Abstract:
Coastal tourist communities are spending big dollars to determine trends and learning how to capitalize on their knowledge.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , July/Aug 1992, p8-11, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
751
Author(s):
Abstract:
Memorial Day marks the rush of tourists to the North Carolina coast. Statistics and profiles of the average North Carolina coastal tourist are provided.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , July/Aug 1992, p12-14, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
814
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state's travel and tourism industry has witnessed noticeable gains from new ads airing nationally and in Canada on cable TV channels. Greater coordination between the state and local authorities also is paying off.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 50 Issue 10, Oct 1992, p30-33, il
Record #:
1882
Author(s):
Abstract:
Western North Carolina relies a great deal on tourism to provide jobs and economic activity for the region. Now, representatives of the region are asking the state to place the same emphasis on tourism as on manufacturing when allocating funds for each.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 52 Issue 9, Sept 1994, p12-14, il
Record #:
2150
Author(s):
Abstract:
With tourism generating revenues between seven and eight billion dollars each year, the 1994 General Assembly earmarked $5 million to promote the state overseas, especially in England and Germany, and to attract travelers who are just passing through.
Source:
Record #:
2292
Author(s):
Abstract:
A lack of usable land to develop, high unemployment, and inadequate infrastructure often lead the state's coastal and mountain counties to depend highly on tourism for revenues, while at the same time seeking other ways to enlarge their economic base.
Record #:
2720
Author(s):
Abstract:
Established in 1963, the Institute of Outdoor Drama at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill shows communities how to attract tourists through local history dramatizations.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
2967
Author(s):
Abstract:
Tourism is the state's second largest industry, and for years certain sections favored by history and geography got most tourist dollars. Today, creative marketing strategies and internet pages enable even the most rural counties to draw tourists.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 54 Issue 7, July 1996, p12,14-15, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
3223
Author(s):
Abstract:
Heritage tourism, or visiting an area for cultural enrichment, is growing six times faster than regular tourism. To handle this growth, the state has set up a non-profit organization, North Carolina Heritage, Inc.
Source:
Record #:
3597
Author(s):
Abstract:
Heritage tourism, or visiting an area for cultural enrichment, has been flourishing in the western counties since the 1920s. Promoting a small community's culture is seen as a way to retain their young people, create jobs, and preserve traditions.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 56 Issue 2, Feb 1998, p28, il
Subject(s):