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43 results for Hurricane Floyd, 1999
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Record #:
4347
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many cities and towns across the state responded to needs caused by the disastrous Hurricane Floyd flooding. In Raleigh, city department heads called their counterparts in flooded areas to see what they could do to help. Raleigh also sent sixteen firefighters to Kinston and twenty police officers to Greenville. Cary sent six teams of building inspectors to Princeville. Over 100 municipalities volunteered help. Police officers, building inspectors, and heavy equipment were among the greatest needs.
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Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 49 Issue 10, Oct 1999, p3, il
Record #:
4422
Author(s):
Abstract:
In a special short session, the North Carolina General Assembly found relief funds for victims of Hurricane Floyd's flooding by cutting the budgets of state departments. Critics charge that the budget cuts will hurt state operations and that the legislature should have increased the state income tax temporarily or levied a sales tax instead.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 16 Issue 51, Dec 1999, p15, il Periodical Website
Record #:
4534
Author(s):
Abstract:
Princeville, home to 2,100 people, was devastated by Hurricane Floyd's flooding. Chartered in 1885, the town was one of the first in the United States founded by former slaves. An executive order issued by President William J. Clinton creates a special council to help preserve and protect Princeville during its rebuilding phase. Presidential executive orders rarely target one municipality for federal assistance.
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Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 50 Issue 3, Mar 2000, p15, il
Record #:
4605
Author(s):
Abstract:
Just hours after receiving the call for help, the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission deployed 128 wildlife officers and 60 boats to help with rescue efforts during Hurricane Flood's flooding. The officers logged 7,877 man-hours and rescued over 1,000 flood victims. Officers also patrolled areas to prevent looting. In Greenville their help was critical in helping keep power on in the city.
Record #:
4611
Author(s):
Abstract:
When floods caused by Hurricane Floyd inundated Eastern Carolina, 128 North Carolina Wildlife Enforcement officers responded to calls for help from local communities. They came with a variety of shallow-draft boats and heavy-duty patrol boats and the know-how to use them in hazardous situations. Wildlife officers rescued over 1,200 people. A number of them share their experiences of these trying days.
Record #:
4610
Author(s):
Abstract:
Eastern North Carolina received 23 inches of rain in two weeks, half of the yearly total, from Hurricanes Dennis and Floyd. The result was a flood of mammoth proportions. Experts also blame man's altering the landscape as a prime cause of the flooding. Earley describes natural landscapes and floods; altered landscapes and floods; and altered landscapes and Hurricane Floyd.
Record #:
4613
Author(s):
Abstract:
The floods resulting from Hurricane Floyd's deluge were North Carolina's greatest natural disaster. Foushee assesses the impact the floods had on wildlife, fisheries, and the Pamlico Sound.
Record #:
4656
Author(s):
Abstract:
Floods from Hurricane Floyd devastated Eastern North Carolina. Coastal waters were affected by an increase of nutrients and decreased levels of salt and oxygen in the estuaries. While the Cape Fear system was able to quickly recover because of a faster flow of water, the Pamlico Sound still has signs of stress. The long-term effect of the flood on these areas is yet to be determined.
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Record #:
4655
Author(s):
Abstract:
Smith describes the effects of Hurricane Floyd on the Brunswick County community of Oak Island, then discusses the Coastal Resources Commission's plans for redevelopment of beach structures in ocean hazard areas.
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Record #:
4668
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hurricane Floyd and the subsequent flooding in September 1999 caused the state's worst natural disaster. Schwab summarizes the storm's disastrous effects on Eastern Carolina and describes the North Carolina Division of Emergency Management's initiative of hazard mitigation that seeks to promote local level planning to insure preparedness the next time a natural disaster strikes.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 65 Issue 3, Spring 2000, p2-12, il
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Record #:
4696
Author(s):
Abstract:
An increased load of nutrients and decreased levels of salt and oxygen in the estuaries were short-term effects of Hurricane Floyd's floods. Estuaries also began to recover more quickly than has been expected. The flood did kill a number of slower moving aquatic animals and affect the food supply of fish. What still remains unknown is the flood's lasting effect.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 19 Issue 3, Summer 2000, p3
Record #:
4725
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hurricanes have struck North Carolina for centuries, destroying lives, property, and the environment. However, it is only recently that scientists seek to understand a hurricane's ecological effect. For example, Hurricane Floyd's flood washed human and natural contaminants into the Pamlico Sound; the sound's salinity also decreased 50 percent, and the chlorophyll level elevated. Scientists are studying these and other effects to learn what it means for the future of the sound and those who depend on it.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 68 Issue 4, Sept 2000, p98-102, 104-105, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
4722
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Abstract:
Malcolm Green, general manager of Greenville Utilities, and fellow employees kept the power on in Greenville during Hurricane Floyd and the subsequent flood. Working round the clock, employees had the determination and ingenuity to hold back the waters which came within two inches of shutting off the power. Had they not succeeded, Greenville would have faced five weeks without water, power, and sewers.
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Record #:
4721
Author(s):
Abstract:
The flood fueled by Hurricane Floyd in the fall of 1999 was massive and destructive. Over 8,000 homes were destroyed, and 15,000 were left uninhabitable. Loss of livestock and crops deprived farmers of their livelihoods. While many citizens have recovered a year later, for others the recovery process is far from over. Worse still, the threat of another storm and flood remains a possibility for the future.
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Record #:
4724
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Floods brought on by Hurricane Floyd were beyond anything people in eastern Carolina could ever imagine, and touched people from every economic level. A number of individuals share their experiences of these trying days.
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