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13 results for Disaster relief
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Record #:
4347
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Abstract:
Many cities and towns across the state responded to needs caused by the disastrous Hurricane Floyd flooding. In Raleigh, city department heads called their counterparts in flooded areas to see what they could do to help. Raleigh also sent sixteen firefighters to Kinston and twenty police officers to Greenville. Cary sent six teams of building inspectors to Princeville. Over 100 municipalities volunteered help. Police officers, building inspectors, and heavy equipment were among the greatest needs.
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Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 49 Issue 10, Oct 1999, p3, il
Record #:
4422
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In a special short session, the North Carolina General Assembly found relief funds for victims of Hurricane Floyd's flooding by cutting the budgets of state departments. Critics charge that the budget cuts will hurt state operations and that the legislature should have increased the state income tax temporarily or levied a sales tax instead.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 16 Issue 51, Dec 1999, p15, il Periodical Website
Record #:
6274
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Many cities and towns across the state responded to the needs caused by the disastrous Hurricane Isabel. Lail describes the aid given to a number of cities, including Edenton. Outside help came from Kentucky, Tennessee, South Carolina, and Texas.
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Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 53 Issue 12, Dec 2003, p7, il
Record #:
15893
Abstract:
Effective disaster management requires advanced planning. News media centers, public information hot-lines, and on-site volunteer procedures must be established in anticipation of large scale emergencies. This article reviews planning programs and policies of 250 public agencies associated with disaster-prone communities, and describes managerial perspectives of disaster planning policy.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 11 Issue 1, Summer 1985, p10-18, f
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Record #:
15968
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Following Hurricanes Dennis, Floyd, and Irene, 66 counties in North Carolina designated as disaster areas by the federal government face a long recovery process as many residents either rebuild or relocate to higher ground. Local, state, and federal policy-makers face the challenge of directing recovery efforts in order to not only restore areas to pre-disaster conditions, but also make communities more disaster-resistant in the future.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 25 Issue 1, Winter 2000, p5-6
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Record #:
15991
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In September 1999, eastern North Carolina experienced a natural disaster of epic proportions. Unfortunately, the federal funds for disaster relief were not as much as originally hoped, and many small businesses and non-profits, including child care providers, were heavily hit. Self-Help, one of the largest community development institutions in the nation, has created a grant program supported by the state of North Carolina to finance loans to child care providers impacted by the flooding.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 26 Issue 1, Spring 2001, p43-46
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Record #:
17479
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Following the Ohio Valley disaster, discussion arose over whether to establish a Central Disaster Relief Committee. The government agency would coordinate already existing government offices like the Highway Commission, Insurance Commission and Red Cross to both prevent and react to natural disasters.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 4 Issue 5, Feb 1937, p4-5
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Record #:
23144
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Emerald Isle Town Manager, Frank Rush, discusses the town's plans for hurricanes and the importance of developing an emergency operations plan so officials can react when a storm strikes.
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Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 65 Issue 2, March/April 2015, p22-24, il
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Record #:
25792
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UNC faculty and students are collaborating with the Kenan Institute Asia to help with tsunami recovery. Projects involve organizing and training entrepreneurs in sustainable business and agriculture, developing ecotourism, and investigating public health problems.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 24 Issue 1, Fall 2007, p10-17, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
31200
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More than two years later, Eastern North Carolina communities are still recovering from the flooding and impacts of Hurricane Floyd in 1999. This article discusses the continuing efforts of North Carolina electric cooperatives, how they were able to restore electrical power following the storm, and lessons learned in disaster preparation and relief.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 34 Issue 7, July 2002, p6, il, por
Record #:
31202
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Experts in road and bridge maintenance and engineering are serving as Disaster Reservists in a new emergency response program in North Carolina. The program is intended to augment the efficiency of helping communities repair damages after a disaster. This article discusses how citizens can become a Disaster Reservist and provides descriptions on various positions in the program.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 34 Issue 7, July 2002, p20, il
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Record #:
31560
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Abstract:
Three winter storms hit North Carolina in January, leaving a swath of destruction and thousands of citizens without electricity. This article features interviews with work crews repairing storm damage in the service area of Randolph Electric Membership Corporation in Asheboro during the second of January’s severe ice storms. Randolph County experienced the costliest damages, and is requesting disaster relief funds.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 10 Issue 3, Mar 1978, p8-11, il, por
Record #:
34257
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Abstract:
On September 5, 1996, North Carolina was hit by Hurricane Fran, the most destructive hurricane ever to strike the state. To prepare for future natural disasters, Governor James B. Hunt, Jr. issued an Executive Order establishing the North Carolina Disaster Recovery Task Force. The task force was charged with making sure resources for recovering from Hurricane Fran were used efficiently and with making recommendations for responding to future disasters.