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39 results for Public health
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Record #:
1676
Author(s):
Abstract:
Researchers at the UNC-Chapel Hill School of Public Health, led by Department of Health Policy and Administration Chair Kerry Kilpatrick, have devised a method of determining Medicaid reimbursable costs to give public health departments much needed funds
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 11 Issue 2, May 1994, p10-11, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
1932
Abstract:
The Community Diagnosis process in North Carolina identifies health problems locally and communicates these problems to the state. It is hoped this approach will assist in allocating funds on a priority basis to meet documented health needs.
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CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 63, Apr 1992, p1-7, il
Record #:
2074
Author(s):
Abstract:
Currently, county health care services are financed through county appropriations, state and federal funds, private grants, and fees. However, national and state debate over health care is affecting how counties meet health care responsibilities.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 60 Issue 2, Fall 1994, p11-20, il, f
Record #:
2274
Author(s):
Abstract:
By law every county health department must provide to county residents such services as child care and family planning. These services may be provided in-house, through a private contractor, or in collaboration with another county.
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Record #:
2724
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Abstract:
Possible changes, including more local control by county commissioners of health programs and expenditures, competition from home health care, and managed heath care systems, could affect the role of local public health departments.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 61 Issue 2, Fall 1995, p14-19, il
Record #:
3788
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many county commissioners want to exert more local control over state-mandated programs and expenditures, like those related to public health. Also, private-sector services, like home care, are competitive. This, and how services will be paid for, will affect the future of public health service.
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Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 77, Apr 1996, p1-6
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Record #:
8268
Author(s):
Abstract:
A school facility is the most expensive public facility that is provided by North Carolina state and local governments. Beyond academic instruction, the school facilities can become activity centers for the communities surrounding them. Land costs, however, are usually the bottom line in school development rather than the positive and negative implications that the location of schools facilities can have on an area. Lentz discusses the school location and development issue and describes what steps Cabarrus County took to improve the process.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 31 Issue 1, Winter 2006, p26-30, il, f
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Record #:
8267
Author(s):
Abstract:
Efforts to improve the understanding of policy and environmental attributes that may support active lifestyles have become a promising area for collaboration between planning and public health professionals. Aytur highlights the results of work performed at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill examining the relationship between planning policies and physical activity and the prevalence of land use policies and implementation tools that might support the viability of non-motorized modes.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 31 Issue 1, Winter 2006, p19-25, il, bibl
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Record #:
11044
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Abstract:
\"In November 2007, several federal agencies jointly issued a new set of regulations intended to help prevent, detect, and mitigate identify theft. The regulations, known as the identify theft 'red flag' rules, require the entities they cover to develop policies and procedures to recognize and respond to circumstances that may indicate identify theft has occurred...\" Jill Moore. This bulletin presents information on red flag rules and their application to local health departments in the state.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 89, Nov 2008, p1-7, f
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Record #:
15878
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Abstract:
County health departments have an important role in protecting water supplies; as more developers elect to construct private wastewater treatment facilities, the control of public health problems has county health departments worried. Issues of public management of private wastewater systems concern on-site disposal systems serving individual homes or several homes, as well as on or off-site community systems. Package treatment plants have recently received the most attention. Ongoing problems with malfunctioning private systems and package treatment plants go beyond public health concerns and hit the municipalities in the pocket. Who pays for necessary repairs or replacement when the private wastewater system fails and the public sector must step in to operate and manage?
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 9 Issue 2, Winter 1983, p30-34, map, f
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Record #:
17889
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Abstract:
The state's health directors met to discuss topics of developing public health concerns like immunizations, pollution, and urbanization. This meeting was one in a series formally recognized as the North Carolina Conference of Health Directors and began with the first meeting in 1963. Conference goals were to assemble the state's public health experts to inform legislation and advise the State Board of Health.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 32 Issue 7, Apr 1966, p9-10, il
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Record #:
25788
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Abstract:
Bird flu is a danger wherever people mingle with birds, especially in crowded, unsanitary conditions. For years, the H5N1 bird flu has been considered an imminent threat to public health because it can transfer from birds to humans. UNC researcher Ray Pickles is trying to find what can prevent the bird flu from becoming a pandemic.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 25 Issue 3, Spring 2009, p37-39, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25896
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Abstract:
Richard Weisler, an adjunct professor of psychiatry, mapped the locations of cancer deaths and suicides and found they were within proximity to asphalt plants in Salisbury, North Carolina. Hydrogen sulfide, a chemical emitted from asphalt plants, is suspected to affect mood and responses to stress.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 22 Issue 2, Winter 2006, p21-24, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26006
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Researchers at the School of Public Health are examining how people and their communities make decisions that encourage or discourage physical activity. They found that levels of physical activity are related to new urban ideals, safety, transportation services, and equity.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 20 Issue 2, Winter 2004, p10-15, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26007
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Abstract:
With the help of an RNA test, UNC doctors uncovered signs of an outbreak that could easily have gone unnoticed. Two North Carolina college students were diagnosed with an acute HIV infection, which could have turned into a public health threat.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 20 Issue 2, Winter 2004, p16-19, il, por Periodical Website
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