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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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16 results for Health surveys
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Record #:
1932
Abstract:
The Community Diagnosis process in North Carolina identifies health problems locally and communicates these problems to the state. It is hoped this approach will assist in allocating funds on a priority basis to meet documented health needs.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 63, Apr 1992, p1-7, il
Record #:
24889
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Veterans Health Administration collaborated with the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System to compare the health conditions and behaviors of discharged male veterans with male non-veterans in North Carolina as well as compared to the United States. As a whole, some of the behaviors and risks explored are smoking, disability, arthritis, and being overweight.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 133, June 2002, p1-6, bibl, f
Record #:
24887
Abstract:
Years of potential life lost refers to the number of years left to live at death below life expectancy. According to the data presented, certain habits and preventative measures can be targeted in health promotion programs.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 130, Feb 2002, p1-9, bibl, f
Record #:
24886
Abstract:
The life expectancy is affected by factors such as how many years will be spent in good mental health, good health and good mobility. This survey shows significant factors affecting health and life expectancy in North Carolina.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 129, Jan 2002, p1-16, il, bibl, f
Record #:
24890
Abstract:
African American women are more likely to get cervical cancer, be diagnosed at a later stage of cancer, and die from cervical cancer. Edwards and Buescher look into the statistics to determine just what the difference between African American and White women getting cervical cancer is.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 134, Aug 2002, p1-5, bibl, f
Record #:
24892
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System monitors the rate of unintended pregnancies in North Carolina. With a PRAMS assessment, 200 new mothers are sent a survey to fill out to determine maternal behaviors before, during, and after pregnancy.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 136, Nov 2002, p1-5, bibl, f
Record #:
29379
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Citizen Survey is conducted to provide data regarding demographic, health, economic, personal opinion and other characteristics of the state’s household population. This report gives background on the survey’s methodology, and highlights results of health-related questions from the Fall 1979 survey.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 19, Nov 1980, p1-7, bibl, f
Record #:
29382
Author(s):
Abstract:
This report presents findings from the Fall 1981 North Carolina Citizen Survey, covering the state’s six health service areas. The health data gives information on health care resources, well-being indicators, use of alcoholic beverages, and residential water and septic use.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 22, June 1982, p1-7, bibl, f
Record #:
29487
Abstract:
The North Carolina Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) survey has been conducted since 1997 to help find out why some babies are born healthy and others are not. This report summarizes survey information and comments collected from mothers in 2004 and 2005. Topics were on prenatal care, folic acid use, breastfeeding, smoking, alcohol use, postpartum blues and depression, toxemia of pregnancy, Medicaid, and satisfaction with prenatal services.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 153, May 2007, p1-13, bibl, f
Record #:
29490
Author(s):
Abstract:
Eye health and use of eye care have not previously been measured among North Carolina adults. In 2006, questions from the newly developed vision module were included in North Carolina’s Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) survey. This study presents data related to impaired vision, eye-care insurance, and recent eye exams.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 155, Dec 2007, p1-5, bibl, f
Record #:
29488
Abstract:
The North Carolina Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) survey is a mail and telephone survey of mothers who have recently given birth. When the characteristics and outcomes of respondents and non-respondents differ, non-response to the survey causes bias in the survey results. This study examined which maternal characteristics are associated with survey non-response.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 154, Oct 2007, p1-6, bibl, f
Record #:
29497
Abstract:
North Carolina has conducted the Youth Tobacco Survey among middle and high school students since 1999. This report summarizes tobacco use prevalence estimates from the 2007 survey and describes changes in prevalence from 1999 to 2007. Overall, results suggest that smoking reduction strategies in North Carolina are successful.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 158, June 2008, p1-7, bibl, f
Record #:
29540
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1976 North Carolina Citizen Survey provided data related to the health and economic characteristics of the state’s household population. Survey results are presented concerning the health and health care of households and adults in each of North Carolina’s six Health Service Areas.
Source:
PHSB Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 7, July 1977, p1-7, bibl, f
Record #:
29545
Author(s):
Abstract:
This report highlights results of the 1977 North Carolina Citizen Survey. The results provide information on population characteristics, chronic health problems, health services, health care availability, restricted activity days due to illness, and health-related personal practices.
Source:
PHSB Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 11, July 1978, p1-7, bibl, f
Record #:
31154
Abstract:
The authors explain the importance of Health Impact Assessments (HIA) in addressing issues of health equity and provide case studies from across North Carolina where HIAs have been conducted.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 38 Issue , 2013, p47-50, il
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