NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


95 results for SCHS Studies
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 7
Next
Record #:
2041
Abstract:
In North Carolina, excess mortality was found among women who work as laborers, sales supervisors, proprietors, and hairdressers, and in such fields as food manufacturing, communication, and hospital care.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 50, Apr 1989, p1-42, il, bibl
Record #:
2043
Abstract:
During the period 1977-79, only seven states had higher house fire death rates than North Carolina. Providing protection from injuries by modifying the home environment would help to reduce house fire mortality.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 46, Sept 1988, p1-11, il, bibl
Record #:
2040
Abstract:
In N.C., women most likely to have received prenatal care were married, employed, wealthier, first-time mothers. Also, women who received primary care from a private physician or health department were more likely to receive some prenatal care.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 48, Feb 1989, p1-16, il, bibl
Record #:
2042
Abstract:
Compared to pregnant women nationwide, North Carolina women are more likely to have more complications and more obstetrical procedures performed, be younger than twenty, earn less than $12,000 yearly, and pay medical bills from their own funds.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 40, July 1986, p1-12, il, bibl
Record #:
2045
Author(s):
Abstract:
Health indicators concerning pregnancy, mortality, and morbidity for the period 1978-1985 indicate that while minorities are healthier and living longer, they continue to suffer illnesses and death disproportionately when compared to whites.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 43, Mar 1987, p1-29, il, bibl
Record #:
2044
Author(s):
Abstract:
With 320 miles of coastline, 65 major rivers, and 100 major lakes, North Carolina ranks high (14th from 1977-79) among the states in deaths by drowning. Examining the circumstances could lead to better prevention.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 42, Aug 1986, p1-9, il, bibl
Record #:
3387
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Maternal Outreach Worker Program of the N.C. Department of Human Resources seeks to increase early utilization of health care systems by low income and at-risk pregnant women, thereby fostering healthier birth opportunities. Results are mixed.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 103, Mar 1997, p1-9, il, f
Record #:
3386
Author(s):
Abstract:
Healthy People 2000 is a program for improving the nation's health by the year 2000. Data for the period 1990-1995 indicate the state has met eleven objectives, is progressing favorably on thirty-two, and is going in the wrong direction on nineteen.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 106, May 1997, p1-31, il, bibl
Record #:
3388
Abstract:
Sudden Death Infant Syndrome (SIDS) is higher among blacks than whites. While a number of risk factors are the same in both groups, higher numbers of risk factors among blacks is a possible cause of more SIDS cases.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 105, May 1997, p1-13, il, bibl
Record #:
3385
Author(s):
Abstract:
Healthy People 2000 is a set of national goals for disease prevention and health promotion to be achieved by the year 2000. The state has yet to achieve a majority of the thirty-seven relating to the health of children ages 1-19.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 102, Feb 1997, p1-28, il, bibl, f
Record #:
3389
Author(s):
Abstract:
Smoking by expectant mothers contributes to low birthweight babies and other problems. Smoking cessation programs would reduce this. Target smokers include whites and American Indians, and women who are unmarried or whose educational level is low.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 101, Oct 1996, p1-13, il, bibl
Record #:
3390
Author(s):
Abstract:
Unmarried women are twice as likely to have low birthweight babies as married women. Reasons for this include low education, smoking during pregnancy, and starting prenatal care late.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 104, Apr 1997, p1-9, il, bibl
Record #:
3401
Abstract:
A number of participants in the N.C. Supplemental Nutritional Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) do not continue after the first year. Reasons for discontinuing assistance include mothers with low education levels and income, and low birthweight babies.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 100, Sept 1996, p1-10, il, bibl
Record #:
3573
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1994 N.C. Birth Cohort Survey, conducted by the State Center for Health Statistics, studied the June, 1994, resident birth population at ages two to four months. Data included infant sleeping positions and domestic violence during pregnancy.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 107, Sept 1997, p1-7, il
Record #:
3574
Author(s):
Abstract:
The death rate for breast cancer in the state declined eleven percent between 1986 and 1995. Survival rates were higher among whites than minorities. Factors for the decline included improved health status for women.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 108, Sept 1997, p1-13, il, bibl