NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


6 results for Pregnant women--Tobacco use
Currently viewing results 1 - 6
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
1409
Author(s):
Abstract:
This study found that, among the low-income population of North Carolina, whites experienced more low birth weight births than blacks, owing to cigarette smoking during pregnancy.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 79, Jan 1994, p1-11, il, f
Record #:
3389
Author(s):
Abstract:
Smoking by expectant mothers contributes to low birthweight babies and other problems. Smoking cessation programs would reduce this. Target smokers include whites and American Indians, and women who are unmarried or whose educational level is low.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 101, Oct 1996, p1-13, il, bibl
Record #:
24891
Abstract:
Maternal smoking can cause harm to an infant in many ways. There is an increased risk for SIDS, and babies are more likely to have a low birth rate which can lead to health complications later in life. If women were to stop smoking during pregnancy, the infant mortality rate would drop significantly.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 135, Aug 2002, p1-6, bibl, f
Record #:
24894
Abstract:
Certain sociodemographic factors, maternal behaviors, and intensity of smoking during pregnancy can determine a baby’s outcome. They may also determine the likelihood a woman will stop smoking during pregnancy. The poorer and less educated a woman is, the less likely she is to quit.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 138, Oct 2003, p1-8, il, bibl, f
Record #:
29470
Abstract:
Smoking is recognized as the number one preventable risk-factor associated with adverse birth outcomes. This study examined the differences in the rate of smoking cessation during pregnancy among mothers in North Carolina who smoked before pregnancy, by selected maternal characteristics. It also examined differences between women who did and did not quit smoking during pregnancy.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 138, Oct 2003, p1-8, il, bibl, f
Record #:
29467
Abstract:
This study used data from live birth and infant death certificates to measure the association between maternal smoking during pregnancy with infant mortality and low birth weight in North Carolina. Results suggest that smoking during pregnancy is significantly associated with higher rates of a variety of adverse birth outcomes.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 135, Aug 2002, p1-6, bibl, f