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14 results for Infants--Mortality
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Record #:
523
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina has a dismal tradition of high infant mortality rates as compared to the other 50 states. However, since 1975 the state has seen a decline in infant deaths thanks to the combined efforts of state and local governments and health care providers.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 54 Issue 1, Summer 1988, p9-14, il, bibl, f
Subject(s):
Record #:
1638
Abstract:
The associations between a poor pregnancy outcome and selected medical conditions of the mother are the focus of this report. Inadequate prenatal care, low weight gain, and complications of labor and delivery are factors to consider.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 83, Apr 1994, p1-13, bibl, f
Subject(s):
Record #:
1893
Abstract:
Pregnant women who participated in the special Supplemental Food Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) were compared to pregnant women not in the program. The results were favorable for the WIC participants.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 55, Mar 1991, p1-8, il, bibl
Record #:
2132
Abstract:
Between 1988 and 1992, infant mortality declined, improving the state's ranking from 49th to 43rd. Further reduction can be achieved if the state's leading causes of infant death, including sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), can be attacked.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 88, Nov 1994, p1-8, il, bibl
Record #:
4047
Author(s):
Abstract:
Between the years 1987-88 and 1995-96, considerable progress was made toward the reduction of birthweight-specific infant mortality. Expanded child and maternal care were contributing factors to the decline. However, other factors, including smoking mothers and minority race, continue to be strong predictors of low birthweight. These factors still need to be addressed.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 112, Jan 1999, p1-7, il, bibl
Record #:
27413
Author(s):
Abstract:
Children are suffering under economic conditions in NC. One out of four are facing hunger, the number of children suffering from abuse is rising, and the infant mortality rate is higher than the national average. Finding money for programs in the state budget is a matter of priority and legislators need to reevaluate their priorities thinking to help NC’s children
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 9 Issue 19, May 8-14 1991, p7-8 Periodical Website
Record #:
29383
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Apgar scoring system is a method of evaluating and rating newborn infants within the first five minutes after birth. This study examined the Apgar scores of infants born in North Carolina between 1978 and 1980, and their one-year survival experience.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 23, Oct 1982, p1-7, bibl, f
Record #:
29394
Author(s):
Abstract:
Infant mortality is a problem throughout the United States. Birth-weight standardization was used to compare North Carolina neonatal mortality to that in the United States and also to examine trends. The study found that North Carolina had a higher neonatal mortality rate, which can be attributed to lower birth weights, rather than higher weight-specific neonatal death rates.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 30, Dec 1983, p1-7, bibl, f
Record #:
29395
Author(s):
Abstract:
Congenital malformations are a public health concern due in part to their ranking as a leading cause of infant mortality. This study utilized North Carolina death certificate data to provide a general description of mortalities due to congenital malformations. A similar examination assessed reports of malformations on birth certificates.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 31, Apr 1984, p1-7, il, bibl, f
Record #:
29467
Abstract:
This study used data from live birth and infant death certificates to measure the association between maternal smoking during pregnancy with infant mortality and low birth weight in North Carolina. Results suggest that smoking during pregnancy is significantly associated with higher rates of a variety of adverse birth outcomes.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 135, Aug 2002, p1-6, bibl, f
Record #:
29544
Author(s):
Abstract:
This study examined the number of North Carolina resident deliveries of live births and fetal deaths according to illegitimate, premarital, and postmarital conceptions. The results showed striking similarities between the premarital and illegitimate populations. Fetal and infant mortality were significantly higher in the illegitimate group than the other two groups.
Source:
PHSB Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 10, Mar 1978, p1-7, map, bibl, f
Record #:
29550
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the last decade, sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) has become widely recognized as the leading category of postneonatal deaths in North Carolina. Several epidemiologic studies have suggested that SIDS deaths tend to cluster, especially seasonally. This study examined the epidemiology of SIDS cases occurring in North Carolina counties, but the distribution of cases did not cluster.
Source:
PHSB Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 16, Dec 1979, p1-7, map, bibl, f
Subject(s):
Record #:
30152
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina State Board of Health's Bureau of Vital Statistics research shows that there is a range in the rate of infant mortality across the state. From the extremes of 15.5 per thousand in Yancey County to 61.3 per thousand in Duplin County, the state average is 34.7 per thousand. However, it is not necessarily the location that dictates the survival but the conditions such as urban versus rural.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 9 Issue 2, June 1951, p14-15, 22, map
Record #:
30249
Abstract:
For several years now, there have been over 100,000 babies born in the North Carolina. With expanded numbers of births, there are expanded provisions and services. Cooperation with the State Board of Health and the Department of Education help protect infants and public school children through treatments and vaccines. As such, there is a stark reduction in infant deaths and certain diseases such as Diphtheria.
Source: