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7 results for Poverty--North Carolina
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Record #:
18338
Author(s):
Abstract:
The disease of poverty is spreading, and North Carolina is often cited a problem area in the nation. Ten percent of the counties surveyed in a nationwide study of hunger and malnutrition are in North Carolina and it is predicted that levels will increase given low income levels in the state and the rising cost of food.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 44 Issue 1, Summer 1978, p52-55, 71
Record #:
21168
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article looks at relief for the poor in North Carolina, a continuous function of the Anglican parishes, county courts, and provincial assembly. Relief to the poor was seen not only as desirable but virtually mandatory, and important precedents were established in theory and practice during this period that would govern society's attitudes toward the poor and poor relief after the Revolution.
Record #:
27413
Author(s):
Abstract:
Children are suffering under economic conditions in NC. One out of four are facing hunger, the number of children suffering from abuse is rising, and the infant mortality rate is higher than the national average. Finding money for programs in the state budget is a matter of priority and legislators need to reevaluate their priorities thinking to help NC’s children
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 9 Issue 19, May 8-14 1991, p7-8 Periodical Website
Record #:
27432
Author(s):
Abstract:
200,000 North Carolinians currently live without indoor plumbing. Scheller describes the effects of poverty and the lack of indoor plumbing when she grew up in the 1960s. Stereotyping, bullying, isolation, and low self-esteem can plague such individuals who cannot afford indoor plumbing.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 8 Issue 1, Jan. 4-10 1990, p9-10 Periodical Website
Record #:
29181
Abstract:
There are 69 programs in six departments of North Carolina's state government that deal with poor, quantifying to $3 billion annually in state funds. In addition to the quantifiable costs of poverty, there is concern that the state's poverty rate is preventing recruitment of new industries, especially in rural areas that need them the most.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 3, March 1991, p12-14, por
Record #:
31402
Author(s):
Abstract:
A new report on poverty from the North Carolina Department of Natural Resources and Development found that nearly one in every five North Carolinians lives at or below the poverty level. The poverty rate is becoming worse due to a combination of factors, including the rise of divorce and separation, compounded by an economic recession and huge federal budget cutbacks.
Record #:
31988
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina has over one-million people who lack the minimum income to meet their family needs. A study conducted by the North Carolina Fund showed that contrary to the widespread belief, the average poor person works forty hours a week or more, would like more job training and wants their children to get a good education. This article discusses the study’s results and implications in North Carolina.
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