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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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24 results for Mortality--Statistics
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Record #:
1889
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina resident death certificate data for the period 1980-1989 were used to draw conclusions regarding the roles that age, race, and sex play in diabetes-related mortality; and regarding recent temporal trends.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 61, Dec 1991, p1-24, il, bibl
Record #:
1895
Author(s):
Abstract:
Head and spinal cord injuries are one of the major, preventable health problems in North Carolina. This study examines head and spinal cord injury mortality from 1979 to 1988. Data is presented by race, gender, age, and cause of death.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 57, June 1991, p1-22, il, bibl
Record #:
1892
Author(s):
Abstract:
While childhood mortality rates have declined during the last decade in North Carolina, state statistics continue to rank above national statistics, though differing greatly on a cause-specific basis. Risk factors and intervention efforts are examined.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 54, July 1990, p1-34, il, bibl, f
Record #:
24880
Abstract:
Robert Meyer and Paul Buescher conducted a study on deaths caused by induced abortion over a 25-year period. They determined the average age, and most frequent age and race associated with death from induced abortion.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. 70 Issue , December 1992, p1-7, il, bibl, f
Record #:
24879
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lee Sullivan conducts a state-wide survey on instances of diabetes related mortality and morbidity. The number of hospitalizations is found to vary based on age, sex, and place of residence.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. 69 Issue , July 1992, p1-18, il, map, bibl, f
Record #:
24883
Abstract:
Race is a factor when it comes to likelihood of mortality rates. The exact impact race has on mortality rates is still not completely understood. Paul Buescher and Jack Leiss conducted this study on how race impacts mortality.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. 82 Issue , April 1994, p1-11, il, bibl, f
Record #:
29509
Abstract:
Between 2000 and 2007, the unintentional overdose death rate in North Carolina more than doubled. Many of the deaths were caused by opioid analgesic use and methadone. To gain a better understanding of unintentional overdoses, this study examined medical and prescription drug paid claims among the North Carolina Medicaid population.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 162, Aug 2010, p1-11, bibl, f
Record #:
29378
Author(s):
Abstract:
In North Carolina, certain causes of death are associated with wide gaps between the sexes and races, with males and nonwhites experiencing substantially higher death rates than their female and white counterparts. The analysis underscores the need for expanded initiatives in public health programs.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 18, Aug 1980, p1-9, il, map, bibl, f
Record #:
29383
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Apgar scoring system is a method of evaluating and rating newborn infants within the first five minutes after birth. This study examined the Apgar scores of infants born in North Carolina between 1978 and 1980, and their one-year survival experience.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 23, Oct 1982, p1-7, bibl, f
Record #:
29393
Abstract:
The North Carolina Division of Health Services monitors and reports child deaths at regular intervals in hope that increased awareness will result in appropriate intervention. A special focus of this report is poor children, specifically, those whose families receive Aid to Families with Dependent Children. Data and analysis of child mortality are presented, and categorized by age and cause of death.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 29, Dec 1983, p1-9, bibl, f
Record #:
29398
Abstract:
This report presents a complete set of life tables (each year of age) based on 1971-1981 mortality data and the 1980 census. These life tables provide a snapshot of the current statewide average mortality experience in North Carolina, and compares life expectancy by race and sex.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 34, May 1984, p1-23, bibl, f
Record #:
29407
Abstract:
This article reviews data on alcohol-related morbidity in North Carolina and addresses the question of alcohol-related mortality. The combination of alcohol and cigarettes contributes to the development of cancers, while excessive alcohol use is a major factor leading to accidental injury and death.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 41, July 1986, p1-13, bibl, f
Record #:
29423
Abstract:
This study examined occupational mortality differences among working-age North Carolinians in order to identify associations between cause of death and occupation. An analysis of death certificate data provided clues to occupational health problems, and suggest which occupations need health promotion/disease prevention activities.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 115, May 1999, p1-19, bibl, f
Record #:
29464
Abstract:
Premature deaths are a national problem and reduction of these deaths is an important objective for health policy. This study measured premature mortality in North Carolina in terms of years of potential life lost, by considering the number of potential years left to live at each age of death.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 130, Feb 2002, p1-9, bibl, f
Record #:
29495
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina has not yet adopted the new national model certificate of live birth, and still uses the birth certificate and death certificate that were adopted in the late 1980s. Because race is perceived in different ways by different people, race as collected on vital records is imprecise. This report compared race and ethnicity of the mother reported on the live birth certificates with race and ethnicity of the decedent reported on the matching infant death certificate.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 156, Feb 2008, p1-5, bibl, f