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11 results for Health and race
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Record #:
1913
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1992 the Governor's Task Force on Health Objectives for the Year 2000 published objectives addressing health concerns in 11 broad areas, such as AIDS. The report identifies special target populations - African-Americans and native Americans.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 77, Nov 1993, p1-17, il, bibl
Record #:
1911
Author(s):
Abstract:
The health status of North Carolina's Native Americans is compared to that of blacks and whites using statistical labels reflecting such factors as low abortion utilization, low maternal education, maternal smoking, birth defects, and suicide.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 75, Aug 1993, p1-53, il, bibl
Record #:
1912
Abstract:
While such health indicators as infant mortality, heart disease, and strokes show improvement among blacks, there still remain serious disparities between the health status of blacks and other North Carolinians.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 76, Oct 1993, p1-103, il, bibl
Record #:
2045
Author(s):
Abstract:
Health indicators concerning pregnancy, mortality, and morbidity for the period 1978-1985 indicate that while minorities are healthier and living longer, they continue to suffer illnesses and death disproportionately when compared to whites.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 43, Mar 1987, p1-29, il, bibl
Record #:
29507
Abstract:
Health disparities for many diseases are large and longstanding in North Carolina and the nation. This study examined medical care costs for diabetes associated with health disparities among adults enrolled in Medicaid in North Carolina during state fiscal year 2007-2008. The impacts of racial and economic health disparities on medical care costs were also compared.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 160, Aug 2009, p1-7, il, bibl, f
Record #:
29508
Author(s):
Abstract:
This study examined colorectal cancer incidence and mortality, as well as stage at diagnosis and treatment patterns among whites and African Americans in North Carolina. The results show that African Americans are less likely to receive appropriate screening and act to reduce the risk of developing colorectal cancer.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 161, Feb 2010, p1-7, il, bibl, f
Record #:
29465
Abstract:
This study examined current differences in North Carolina between African-American and white women in cervical cancer incidence, stage at diagnosis, treatment, and mortality. Results suggest the need for increased preventative cervical cancer screening for African-American women, so that cancer cases can be detected at an earlier stage.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 134, Aug 2002, p1-5, bibl, f
Record #:
29476
Abstract:
This study examined the relationship between health status and perceived social treatment based on race among North Carolina adults. Using data from the North Carolina Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), the results show that racism is an important underlying determinant of health disparities and quality of life.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 144, Sep 2004, p1-12, bibl, f
Subject(s):
Record #:
29495
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina has not yet adopted the new national model certificate of live birth, and still uses the birth certificate and death certificate that were adopted in the late 1980s. Because race is perceived in different ways by different people, race as collected on vital records is imprecise. This report compared race and ethnicity of the mother reported on the live birth certificates with race and ethnicity of the decedent reported on the matching infant death certificate.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 156, Feb 2008, p1-5, bibl, f
Record #:
29549
Author(s):
Abstract:
While the number of Indian residents is sufficiently large, the Public Health Statistics Branch typically reports data for whites and nonwhites only. At the request of the North Carolina Commission for Indian Affairs, an analysis was done on race-specific birth and mortality data. The results show that vital characteristics of Indians are different when compared to white and black populations.
Source:
PHSB Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 15, June 1979, p1-6, bibl, f
Record #:
40324
Author(s):
Abstract:
Navigating rural communities toward wellness are volunteer health advisors, graduates of a program operated by the Brody School of Medicine and College of Nursing. Working in homes, churches, and community organizations, they, under the guidance of licensed health care professionals, help individuals manage chronic diseases. Activities offered through this program include nutrition classes, health fairs, and periodic progress checks.