NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


7 results for Minorities--Health and hygiene
Currently viewing results 1 - 7
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
1913
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1992 the Governor's Task Force on Health Objectives for the Year 2000 published objectives addressing health concerns in 11 broad areas, such as AIDS. The report identifies special target populations - African-Americans and native Americans.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 77, Nov 1993, p1-17, il, bibl
Record #:
1911
Author(s):
Abstract:
The health status of North Carolina's Native Americans is compared to that of blacks and whites using statistical labels reflecting such factors as low abortion utilization, low maternal education, maternal smoking, birth defects, and suicide.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 75, Aug 1993, p1-53, il, bibl
Record #:
2045
Author(s):
Abstract:
Health indicators concerning pregnancy, mortality, and morbidity for the period 1978-1985 indicate that while minorities are healthier and living longer, they continue to suffer illnesses and death disproportionately when compared to whites.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 43, Mar 1987, p1-29, il, bibl
Record #:
2273
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many of the state's minority children under age two are behind in their immunizations. To remedy this situation, the state initiated the Immunization Action Plan, a program that creates an immunization registry and a vaccine distribution system.
Full Text:
Record #:
2265
Author(s):
Abstract:
The N.C. Center for Public Policy Research conducted a year- long study of the health status of the state's minorities. The study revealed that minorities are less healthy and die at a younger age than the white population.
Source:
North Carolina Insight (NoCar JK 4101 N3x), Vol. 15-16 Issue 4 & 1, Mar 1995, p2-24; 28-31; 44-46; 49-56; 60-63; 69, il, f Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
2302
Author(s):
Abstract:
There are few positive health trends in children ages birth to 9. Although the infant death rate has decreased, child abuse has increased. Moreover, health disparities remain between minority and white children.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 93, May 1995, p1-61, il, bibl
Record #:
6767
Author(s):
Abstract:
McLaughlin gives a summary of health outcomes between minorities and the white majority. He records disparities between the races, both children and adults. Areas he looked at include death rates from heart disease, cancer, and diabetes; child fatalities; teenage pregnancy; and sexually transmitted diseases.
Full Text: