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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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10 results for Pregnant women
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Record #:
2042
Abstract:
Compared to pregnant women nationwide, North Carolina women are more likely to have more complications and more obstetrical procedures performed, be younger than twenty, earn less than $12,000 yearly, and pay medical bills from their own funds.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 40, July 1986, p1-12, il, bibl
Record #:
24876
Abstract:
Drug use during pregnancy is a growing problem. Michael Bowling, Julie Truax, and Donna Scandlin are conducting an experiment to find out just how big of a problem drug use during pregnancy is becoming.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. 66 Issue , June 1992, p1-10, il, bibl, f
Record #:
24884
Author(s):
Abstract:
Those living in poverty may have an increased risk for preterm births. This is especially relevant for those of African American descent.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. 99 Issue , February 1996, p1-12, il, bibl, f
Record #:
24892
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System monitors the rate of unintended pregnancies in North Carolina. With a PRAMS assessment, 200 new mothers are sent a survey to fill out to determine maternal behaviors before, during, and after pregnancy.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 136, Nov 2002, p1-5, bibl, f
Record #:
29402
Author(s):
Abstract:
In North Carolina and across the United States, birth rates have steadily fallen over the past several decades. In recent years, however, both the birth rate and the induced abortion rate of older women have risen, and first-time births among women of ages thirty and older have risen sharply. Problems that may be associated with delayed and limited childbearing are examined and discussed in this report.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 38, Sep 1985, p1-16, il, bibl, f
Record #:
29428
Author(s):
Abstract:
Postpartum depression is a substantial problem affecting mothers and their families. A sample of mothers was obtained from the North Carolina Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System, and used to assess the impact of individual life stressors on the risk of postpartum depression. Several major stressors were unemployment, economic adversities, isolation and loss of social support.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 121, Sep 2000, p1-9, bibl, f
Record #:
29468
Author(s):
Abstract:
Unintended pregnancies are those that are unwanted or occur before a woman intended to become pregnant. This study provides current descriptive data for North Carolina on the prevalence of unintended pregnancy and its correlates, for use by public health programs in the state. The data was obtained from the North Carolina Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS).
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 136, Nov 2002, p1-5, bibl, f
Record #:
29466
Abstract:
Women are encouraged to take a daily multivitamin containing folic acid or consider alternative dietary options in order to decrease pregnancy risks. This study examined the willingness of Latino women living in North Carolina to use these options.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 141, Apr 2004, p1-8, bibl, f
Record #:
29548
Author(s):
Abstract:
The causes of two birth defect conditions, congenital tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) and oesophageal atresia (OA), are poorly understood. An analysis of TEF and OA clusters suggests that women who are within early stages of pregnancy during times of high incidence of Type A influenza are at higher risk of giving birth to a child with TEF or OA.
Source:
PHSB Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 14, Mar 1979, p1-5, il, bibl, f
Record #:
36571
Author(s):
Abstract:
A substance abuse counselor had a dream about creating a house offering a place for recovering from substance abuse. The dream made a reality in 1995 serves recovering women who are either pregnant or caring for a child under the age of five. Also offering a place to successfully transition into society, it fulfills this mission through teaching skills in recovery, parenting, and independent living. Helping also with their transition are individual and group counseling, self-care groups, case management, and crisis intervention.