NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


12 results for Lowry, Scott
Currently viewing results 1 - 12
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
22
Author(s):
Abstract:
Peter Gal, Director of Greensboro's Area Health Education Center Pharmacy Education Division, is developing two techniques, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, to assist the clinical pharmacist in the treatment of hospitalized infants and children.
Source:
Record #:
24
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lowry discusses New Hanover County's efforts to reduce infant mortality and profiles Deborah Covington, director of Wilmington's Area Health Education Center.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 9 Issue 1, Fall 1991, p1-11, por Periodical Website
Record #:
129
Author(s):
Abstract:
UNC-Chapel Hill Professor Dr. J. Stephen Haskill's discovery of the I kappa B gene has the potential to revolutionize research on the immune system and disease.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 9 Issue 2, Spring 1992, p12-13, por Periodical Website
Record #:
1058
Author(s):
Abstract:
A work-study program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's School of Information and Library Science is one of the most innovative in the nation. Interns' experience at the EPA library in Research Triangle Park is invaluable.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 10 Issue 2, Apr 1993, p12-13, por Periodical Website
Record #:
1056
Author(s):
Abstract:
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill professor Kenneth Thorpe discusses his intentions as a new member of President Clinton's health policy transition team.
Source:
Record #:
1680
Author(s):
Abstract:
Frederic Pfaender, professor and researcher in the UNC-Chapel Hill Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, is searching for ways to decrease soil pollution so that our drinking water will be safer and less contaminated.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 11 Issue 2, May 1994, p12-14, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
2252
Author(s):
Abstract:
A joint experiment, the Hoechst Celanese Corporation & University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Research Partnership is applying total quality management principles to research projects that, it is hoped, will be mutually beneficial.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 12 Issue 1, Nov 1994, p6-10, il Periodical Website
Record #:
2535
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1954, Oliver Smithies made one of the most important discoveries in molecular genetics. Forty years of research later, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill professor is still at the top of his field.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 12 Issue 3, July 1995, p10-12, il Periodical Website
Record #:
26185
Author(s):
Abstract:
Climatologist Peter Robinson maintains that the media hype surrounding the so-called greenhouse effect has distracted attention from the real implications of global climate change. In addition to changing temperatures, Robinson anticipates issues related to wind, pollution, solar radiation, and rainfall patterns.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 10 Issue 1, Fall 1992, p7-9, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
26189
Author(s):
Abstract:
Craig Melchert, professor of linguistics, studies extinct Anatolian languages. Anatolian developed from a language spoken by Indo-European people who moved to Asia Minor from north of the Black Sea by 2000 B.C. Melchert traces the linguistic history to understand how ancient people thought and lived.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 10 Issue 1, Fall 1992, p16-17, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
26190
Author(s):
Abstract:
A Buckeyball molecule is a soccer-ball shaped form of carbon that has potential for numerous research opportunities. Professor Edward Samulski of the chemistry department found a way to make buckyballs easier for scientists to use.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 10 Issue 3, July 1993, p9-11, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
26207
Author(s):
Abstract:
Kermit Nash and Kathryn Kramer, researchers at the School of Social Work, are studying the support systems sickle cell disease patients use to overcome the effects of the disease. Their longitudinal project uses social science research methods to understand how physiological, psychological, and social components interact with a patient’s well-being.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Spring 1991, p15-17, il, por Periodical Website