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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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7 results for Race awareness
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Record #:
1896
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1988 North Carolina implemented a new birth certificate form, adding new items and revising others in order to elicit better information on demographic, behavioral, and medical factors influencing fertility and pregnancy outcomes.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 58, June 1991, p1-15, il, bibl
Record #:
1897
Author(s):
Abstract:
An update of the North Carolina Birth Defects Registry is reported. Selected tabulations of 1988 data, the first year the new, expanded birth certificate went into effect, are presented.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 60, Dec 1991, p1-11, il, bibl
Record #:
2501
Author(s):
Abstract:
Type of delivery was first listed on state birth certificates in 1988. At that time the cesarean rate for the state was 25.1 percent; by 1993, it had declined to 22.4 percent.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 96, Sept 1995, p1-10, il, bibl
Record #:
6803
Abstract:
This study seeks “to compare race as reported by the mother on North Carolina birth certificates with the data on race on the officially reported statistics.” The study concluded “that given the opportunity to report their own race, North Carolinians describe their race with a wide variety of terms and concepts. In contrast, health statistics are usually reported using a few standardized racial categories defined by federal policy.” Standard terms would include White, Black, Indian, and Chinese. Self-chosen identification includes White/Hispanic, Egyptian/Canadian, and Cambodian.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 139, Feb 2004, p1-6, il, bibl
Record #:
34448
Abstract:
Over the course of the 18th century, the native North Carolina Chowan population adopted European practices and sold their allocated reservation lands to conform and survive in the British colony. These actions led to their reclassification from “Indians” to “Colored People” by colonial officials, who also assumed there was a loss of cultural identity. Contemporary writers incorrectly believed the Chowans no longer existed as a political or cultural entity, however an examination of archival and oral histories indicates that the Chowan people have maintained their cultural identity. Furthermore, their colonial racial reclassification is indicative of attitudes towards race and identity formation in the 18th century.
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Record #:
34683
Author(s):
Abstract:
Born in Germany to a North Carolina-native mother, Michael Gotting grew up with his adopted German, white family. He has ties to North Carolina, Berlin, and now Canada. Having roots in all of these places has helped him develop themes for his writing, specifically racism and music.
Source:
North Carolina Literary Review (NoCar PS 266 N8 N66x), Vol. 26 Issue , 2017, p34-47, il, por, f Periodical Website
Record #:
35337
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article discussed how races, a category for human beings, is based on physical features such as skin pigmentation. It asserted that people are more similar than different because the development of physical features was a climatic adaptation.
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