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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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30 results for Race relations
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Record #:
149
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NC STAR is a program designed to urge elementary and high school students to act as agents for social change, especially in the arena of race relations.
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Voice (NoCar LB 2831.624 N8 V6x), Vol. 5 Issue 6, Winter 1992, p25-26
Record #:
1094
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Buckner surveys written works that deal with slavery and race relations, with a focus on works of NC writers, both black and white, who confronted these issues in their writings.
Record #:
1289
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Last week Durham played host to the Creating Change Conference, the country's largest gay political gathering, whose attendants urged the gay movement to link itself to the struggle of other minority groups.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 11 Issue 46, Nov 1993, p10, por Periodical Website
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2000
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High Point's Robert J. Brown directs his company, B & C Associates, in advising some of the country's largest companies on race relations. Brown is a former principal adviser to President Nixon on minority issues.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 52 Issue 11, Nov 1994, p8-11, il
Record #:
17073
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Cader Harris of Elizabeth city has been awarded the Nancy Susan Reynolds Award. Harris, 84, received the award, which is given to \"unsung heroes\" annually, for his work in promoting good race relations in his community.
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Record #:
21564
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The article examines the history of the Fellowship of Southern Churchmen (FSC), an interdenominational, reformist organization from its founded in 1934 to its transformation into the Committee of Southern Churchmen in 1963. During its short history, the FSC acted as an outlet for Christian people to work towards a better South where race was not an issue as it helped start an era of change in southern race relations.
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21664
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This article examines the often violent relationship between slaves and poor whites in the antebellum Carolinas. In poor white communities, the ideal of honor was very important to a man's standing in the community. When a poor white man was not respected in his community, he still demanded respect in the black community, often using force to achieve it.
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Record #:
21677
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This article examines the creation of segregated white private schools in Edgecombe, Halifax, and Nash counties after the 1954 'Brown v. Board of Education' Supreme Court decision. The movement to create private white schools was founded upon the mission of whites to maintain control over education and preserve social class structure.
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North Carolina Historical Review (NoCar F251 .N892), Vol. 81 Issue 4, Oct 2004, p393-425 , il, por, map, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
21753
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This article examines the efforts in Wilson County between 1941 and 1953 by educational activists who fought for equal educational opportunities for African-American students. The article discusses the poor conditions forced upon students and the role of the NAACP and activist Mark Sharpe has in improving those conditions.
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Record #:
21781
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This article examines the study by economist Robinson Newcomb on African-American business enterprises in the U.S. South in the 1920s. Newcomb's study met with resistance from white academics and civic leaders. His work at the Institute for Research in Social Science at the University of North Carolina is also discussed.
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21782
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This article examines the Blue Ridge YMCA conference center near the town of Black Mountain and its attempts to better race relations in the U.S. South. The 1906 founding of the center by Willis Duke Weatherford is also discussed, as it was one of the only social institutions in the South where racial issues were openly discussed.
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Record #:
24898
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An examination of the life of an average citizen living in Charlotte in 1968 provides a view of the history of race relations, from the desegregation lunch counters to the still-present dangers for African Americans today.
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Record #:
25422
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After 150 students showed up at ECU President Leo Jenkins’ front door, new changes were made to better incorporate the African American student body and make their life at ECU more comfortable.
Record #:
25660
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UNC doctoral student Darin Waters is writing the history of the Young Men’s Institute Cultural Center at the Biltmore Estate, which has offered educational programs and other services for African Americans in Asheville since 1893. Waters discovered the Biltmore Estate did not did not force African Americans to leave; rather, Biltmore was part of a mutual agreement that relied on the help of black craftsman and philanthropy.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 26 Issue 1, Fall 2009, p24-27, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
21953
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In this article by Mrs. T.J. Jarvis, wife of North Carolina governor Thomas J. Jarvis, she describes the Ku Klux Klan's rise in the South after the Civil War, responding to social and cultural changes occurring at the time.
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