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8 results for Abnormalities--Human
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Record #:
1675
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1992 the UNC-Chapel Hill Birth Defects Center was created with a mission to disclose the factors that cause developmental abnormalities. Thomas Sadler, the center's director, and Kathleen Sulik play crucial roles in researching such defects.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 11 Issue 2, May 1994, p7-9, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
1897
Author(s):
Abstract:
An update of the North Carolina Birth Defects Registry is reported. Selected tabulations of 1988 data, the first year the new, expanded birth certificate went into effect, are presented.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 60, Dec 1991, p1-11, il, bibl
Record #:
1890
Author(s):
Abstract:
A more comprehensive way to inventory birth defects is now available through the new North Carolina Birth Defects Registry, which provides data to health professionals and others studying causes of specific birth defects.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 52, Sept 1989, p1-15, il, bibl, f
Subject(s):
Record #:
1919
Author(s):
Abstract:
Statistics from the 1988-1990 North Carolina Birth Defects Registry are presented. Statistical tables give the reader perspectives on the prevalence of birth defects in the state as well as orientation to using and interpreting birth defects data.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 74, May 1993, p1-9, bibl
Record #:
1934
Abstract:
The deaths of several babies born with abnormalities at Fort Bragg led one mother to discover a common link - the babies' parents had been exposed toxins during the Persian Gulf War.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 12 Issue 38, Sept 1994, p16-19, il Periodical Website
Record #:
29482
Abstract:
In North Carolina, orofacial clefts are one of the most prevalent serious birth defects. This study examined factors associated with referral to specialized services among infants with orofacial clefts. Receiving Medicaid and maternal care coordination services were positively associated with referral to the Child Service Coordination Program among infants with orofacial clefts.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 149, Dec 2005, p1-10, bibl, f
Record #:
29496
Abstract:
Orofacial clefts can impair child development and psychomotor and cognitive skills. Services and treatment for children with orofacial clefts can vary depending on cleft severity, presence of associated syndromes, other birth defects and age. This study examined the proportion of children with orofacial clefts enrolled in Medicaid who received primary cleft surgery or received specialized services.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 157, Apr 2008, p1-5, bibl, f
Record #:
29548
Author(s):
Abstract:
The causes of two birth defect conditions, congenital tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) and oesophageal atresia (OA), are poorly understood. An analysis of TEF and OA clusters suggests that women who are within early stages of pregnancy during times of high incidence of Type A influenza are at higher risk of giving birth to a child with TEF or OA.
Source:
PHSB Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 14, Mar 1979, p1-5, il, bibl, f