NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


15 results for Buncombe County--Industry
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
12698
Abstract:
The Gerber Company in Buncombe County is a good example of the kind of industry which stimulates benefits for people unfamiliar with the plant. Providing a handsome payroll for county residents, the factory is already using approximately 3,500 tons of North Carolina vegetables, and 3,000 tons of fruit. Packing from 2,500,000 to 3,000,000 containers of baby food per week, Gerber furnishes employment to an average of 350 men and women from the Asheville and Hendersonville areas, with a payroll over $1,000,000 annually.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 10, Oct 1961, p10, 24, il
Full Text:
Record #:
14858
Abstract:
Asheville was the hub of Buncombe County industry. It featured no less than sixty manufacturing plants and employed more than 15,000 people. Five bottling companies were located in the greater Asheville area, including a Coca-Cola and Nehi plant. Important industries were also located outside of Asheville. Enka, located six miles west of Asheville, was home to one of the largest factories in the South, the American Enka Corporation, where workers spun rayon thread from spruce pulp. The Beacon Manufacturing Company, located in Swannanoa, produced blankets that sold worldwide.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 15, Sept 1943, p16-20, por
Full Text:
Record #:
23810
Abstract:
A solar field in Buncombe County, North Carolina makes use of wasted landfill field space. The facility was completed by FLS Energy, who aimed to produce clean energy from the landfill.
Source:
Record #:
24144
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article features why Asheville in Buncombe County is popular with locals and tourists alike. The county is not only a hub of business and enterprise, but also home to countless forms of entertainment and tourist attractions.
Record #:
24493
Author(s):
Abstract:
After North Carolina and other states in the South lifted their laws that limited the alcohol content of craft-brewed beverages, the hard cider industry made a comeback. Two Asheville men, Trevor Baker and Lief Stevens started Nobel Cider in 2012. They use local apples for their hard cider and distribute their product as far east as Charlotte.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
24709
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author discusses the various ways both city dwellers and urbanites have joined together to create a program to develop the Buncombe County agriculturally. The community works together to help agriculture make a slow but steady comeback.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 36, February 1952, p12-12, 17, il
Full Text:
Record #:
24752
Author(s):
Abstract:
Barkley’s Mill began its production of grits in 2013 and orders for the grits are coming in from across the country already. This article briefly highlights how the mill got up and running and discusses the challenges of farming in the mountains of North Carolina.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
24822
Author(s):
Abstract:
National Wiper Alliance Inc. is recognized as the 2015 BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA Small Business of the Year. Company president, Jeff Slosman, founded National Wiper in 1996 when looking for a way to reuse a dilapidated textile mill building in Swannanoa. National Wiper produces nonwoven wipes for restaurants, military contractors, and nursing homes, employs eighty-five, and projects 2015 revenues at $95 million.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
26928
Author(s):
Abstract:
Danny’s Dumpster in Buncombe County transforms 40 tons of organic trash per week into nutrient-rich topsoil. The composting company hopes to raise awareness and reduce the number of food leftovers and paper products that make their way to the landfill.
Source:
Record #:
26925
Author(s):
Abstract:
Asheville-Buncombe Tech Community College in Asheville offers a Sustainability Technologies program for students and now has more resources to train students for jobs in alternative energy, construction, and manufacturing industries.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
27672
Author(s):
Abstract:
Avadim Tecnologies Inc. CEO, Steve Woody, discusses the establishment of his business, its past trials, and current growth. The company develops and sells a bacterial wash called Theroworx, which is used to prevent antibiotic-resistant bacteria such as MRSA. Now the company is poised to grow locally and sell its product around the world.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
27828
Author(s):
Abstract:
The New Belgium beer company opened its east coast brewery in Asheville in 2016. Locals love the beer and the city improvements brought on by the brewery’s arrival, but some still question whether it should be considered a local business or not.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 10, March 2017, p150-154, 156, 158, il, map Periodical Website
Record #:
35334
Author(s):
Abstract:
As tobacco was a popular cash crop in North Carolina, the methods and terms used to raise and harvest the tobacco are shared between regions. From preparing the tobacco beds to selling, and touching on hazards and illegal practices, the author gained most of his knowledge from his grandfather. With illustration.
Record #:
38236
Author(s):
Abstract:
A Weaverville company’s handiwork is displayed globally and beyond. Started in 1941, A-B Emblem is identified as one of the three largest patchmaking companies in the world. Included in this family-owned business’ clientele are the US Army and Department of Homeland Security. Included in the patches pictured are ones made for NASA astronaut Thomas P. Stafford, Daytona International Speedway, and the Fire on the Mountain Blacksmith Festival.