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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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20 results for Solar energy
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Record #:
7805
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North Carolina Solar Center, located at North Carolina State University, maintains a database of solar energy information and is one of the country's leading institutions for solar and other renewable energy.
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Record #:
15803
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An alternative in energy technology is solar powered space heating and cooling. The author describes a solar heating and cooling system for a single family home in the Southeast, examining the system's costs and benefits.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 3 Issue 1, Winter 1977, p34-39, il
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Record #:
18555
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A recent technological and economic trend that has gone largely unnoticed has been the increased use of solar energy in North Carolina. Today over 3,000 passive solar homes, 2,000 domestic solar water-heating systems, and 300 active solar space heating systems are being used in the state.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 49 Issue 2, Fall 1983, p21-27, bibl, f
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Record #:
23810
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A solar field in Buncombe County, North Carolina makes use of wasted landfill field space. The facility was completed by FLS Energy, who aimed to produce clean energy from the landfill.
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Record #:
27364
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Raleigh resident Mike Nicklas is a solar architect, educator, and activist devoted to increasing the use of solar and clean renewable energy. His company, Innovative Design, focuses on increasing energy efficiency in schools and public buildings through the use of solar. Nicklas’ solar project at Four Oaks Elementary in Johnston County has greatly reduced the cost of energy at a time when school budgets are shrinking. Nicklas is slated to speak to the United Nations about solar power and its positive effects on the environment, public health, and to stop global warming.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 9 Issue 28, July 1991, p7-8 Periodical Website
Record #:
30407
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With Bell Telephone Laboratories' development of a solar battery, more companies, states, and departments are looking to research the possibility of transforming solar energy into electrical energy. Functions such as solar heating are of particular interest, along with solar evaporation techniques and solar energy to create clean drinking water.
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Record #:
30812
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North Carolina’s largest solar electric installation at a public school brings power to the grid and lessons to Cherokee County students. The rural school system is focusing on energy conservation and renewable energy production as ways to fill gaps in its education budget. Martins Creek School is the first school in the county to install solar power arrays, funded by Solar Energy Initiatives.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 42 Issue 9, Sept 2010, p26-27, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
30984
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The largest solar power plant on a building in the Southeast is up and running in Benson, North Carolina. The solar electricity system was designed and installed by Hamlin Energy Solutions. Hamlin produces thirty percent of its own plant’s energy requirements with the rooftop solar system, resulting in a carbon-free method of generating electric power.
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Record #:
31530
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Mother Earth News is a widely read magazine on natural living, organic gardening, solar energy and other sustainable practices. The organization’s managers are developing an “Eco Village” for its headquarters in Hendersonville. The village will feature two solar greenhouses, a farm, camping sites, picnic areas, and nature trails.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 12 Issue 8, Aug 1980, p10, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31528
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Robert Williams of Maggie Valley invented a new type of solar collector which could help alleviate the problems of excessive cost and low efficiency. Williams and his family also own the Meadowbrook Resort, where a working model of his solar collector is atop one of the greenhouses. In this article, Williams describes his invention, the solar greenhouse, and the future of solar energy.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 12 Issue 6, June 1980, p8-9, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31595
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North Carolina’s climate is varied, but every area of the state could use solar energy for space and hot water heating. With five major mirror manufacturers, North Carolina is also a valuable resource for solar materials. This article describes research being conducted by the state’s universities, and several developments in solar technology.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 9 Issue 4, Apr 1977, p11-14, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
31594
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Leon Neal, applications engineer with the North Carolina Science and Technology Research Center, discusses imaginative methods of harnessing the sun for energy, electricity, heat, and water. Rural areas in North Carolina are particularly suited to the use of solar energy.
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Record #:
35687
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The author disclosed that short term costs for installing solar power, whether by flat-plate or heating system, was high. In light of long term benefits, plus its plentitude, Lofton proposed it was an investment worthy alternate fuel source.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1978, p27-29
Record #:
35843
Author(s):
Abstract:
Solar power was a commonly perceived power source of the future. The author proved it was an energy source of the ages—harnessed as far back as antiquity, in fact. To prove it a feasible solution for the current energy crisis, he discussed the facility of active and passive solar power. He also proposed how homes could be retrofitted, or equipped, to generate this type of power.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Mar 1980, p23-26, 55-56, 58
Record #:
35872
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The title wasn’t an allusion to Theodore Dreiser’s novel, but solar power, lately harnessed by suburbanites. Among them were the Adamczyks and Jones, who have discovered the virtues of this alternative fuel source. Virtues highlighted: saving the environment and on one’s utility bill.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 6, Aug 1980, p18-19