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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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5 results for Gristmills
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Record #:
24757
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Abstract:
Very few gristmills still operate in North Carolina today, but they were once very important to communities. Some mills still produce flour and corn meal today for the customers who prefer locally grown and ground material. The article highlights the history of two North Carolina mills: the Old Mill of Guilford and the Lakeside Mills.
Source:
North Carolina Field and Family (NoCar S 1 N672), Vol. 2 Issue 4, Winter 2015, p18-21, il, por, map
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Record #:
24752
Author(s):
Abstract:
Barkley’s Mill began its production of grits in 2013 and orders for the grits are coming in from across the country already. This article briefly highlights how the mill got up and running and discusses the challenges of farming in the mountains of North Carolina.
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Record #:
17280
Author(s):
Abstract:
The mill tells an important story about colonial life and the colonial economy. Colonial mills in the Mountain and Piedmont regions used the energy from water, and wind usually powered the Coastal Plain mills' machinery. These mills were usually grist or sawmills.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 51 Issue 2, Spring 2012, p28-30, il, f
Record #:
29711
Author(s):
Abstract:
The nineteenth century saw the proliferation of water-driven gristmills, liberating rural people from laborious hand grinding and providing community gathering places. Although automation largely replaced traditional milling, many mills still operate today, including the Dellinger Mill near Bakersville, North Carolina.
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Record #:
35754
Author(s):
Abstract:
A fragile wilderness could be found in Merchants Millpond State Park, on the southern edge of the Great Dismal Swamp. Despite its fragility, it had an important place and long history in the area. During the nineteenth century, the Millpond contained a gristmill, wheat mill, and sawmill. By the twentieth century, it had become the largest trading center in Gates County. Its present purpose: a viable habitat for animals such as river otters and plant species such as the water violet. As for the State Park’s benefits to humans, that included activities such as camping and backpacking, drawing and guided tours.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 4, July/Aug 1979, p34-35