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12 results for Mills--History
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Record #:
14502
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Two generations ago, old water mills, whose remains furnish vistas of a civilization during the latter part of the 19th-century, was a social institution in many parts of North Carolina.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 5, June 1945, p9, 17, f
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Record #:
15385
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Mill village refers to the community developed in conjunction with any mill. Traditionally mill owners built and maintained homes for their employees to rent and supplied these makeshift villages with deputy services. Mr. Ferrell of Raleigh proposed a new plan of individual ownership of mill homes and the property to alleviate the mill owner's financial burden and to instill mill workers with a sense of pride in owning a home.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 13, Aug 1935, p1, 22, il
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Record #:
24309
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A mill in Kannapolis was bought out by Pillowtex Corp., of Dallas, Texas. Pillowtex plans to consolidate all offices in Dallas, essentially moving management and administrative positions out of Kannapolis. Additional job cut are expected to affect both the mill and the area.
Record #:
24639
Abstract:
An excerpt from the 1881 Travel Book ‘In the Heart of the Alleghanies,’ this article presents a true ghost story of the Smoky Mountains that centers around a mid-1800s mill on the Cheowah River. A number of people died there, prompting the mills close down and subsequent rumors that it was haunted.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 19, February 1959, p10-12, 24, il
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Record #:
28550
Abstract:
The history of post-mills in North Carolina and the location of a replica post mill in Dare County are detailed. Post-mills were common along the Outer Banks during the 18th and 19th centuries in Carteret, Hyde, and Dare counties. In the 1970s Lynanne Wescott built a replica post-mill located at Island Farm on Roanoke Island and it has become a local landmark.
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Record #:
28647
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For many children of mill workers at the Loray Mill in Gastonia, summer was filled with memories of vacations at Camp Firestone on Lake James. Camp Firestone offered a vacation from the rigors of work at the mill, while allowing vacationers to be among the friends they lived with in the mill village and worked next to in the mill. The history of the mill-run vacation destination and its place in the lives of mill workers is told.
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Record #:
29022
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Memories of the Bailes Old Mill north of Greensboro, the history of millponds in North Carolina, and a family’s history are told. The author describes how his grandmother, Berta “Bee” Roberts, created a painting of Bailes Millpond and how the mill was tied to his family’s history.
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Record #:
29115
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Jordan’s Mill Pond in Northampton County is a three-hundred-acre freshwater pond, complete with a mill house and dam. According to legend around the town of Seaboard, the mill house is over 150 years old. The pond’s ownership changed numerous times over the years but now the mill is no longer running.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1978, p42-43, il
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Record #:
29711
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The nineteenth century saw the proliferation of water-driven gristmills, liberating rural people from laborious hand grinding and providing community gathering places. Although automation largely replaced traditional milling, many mills still operate today, including the Dellinger Mill near Bakersville, North Carolina.
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Record #:
31002
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In January 1881, Thomas Benson Ledbetter purchased one-hundred acres and with his nephew, John Steel Ledbetter, as a partner, built South Union Mills in Rockingham, North Carolina. It was in operation until 1894 when the mill burned due to a lightning strike. The mill was rebuilt as Ledbetter Manufacturing Company, sold to Parsons Manufacturing in 1979, and later renovated into today’s upscale Carolyn’s Mill Condominiums.
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Record #:
34742
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In 1914, Orion Knitting Mills moved their operations from Kinston to Beaufort, North Carolina. To entice the company into moving, Beaufort citizens purchased a lot and erected a building for company use. Local businessmen further influenced the town to exempt the mill for taxes and electrical payments for the first five years of operation. In July, 1914 the company agreed and erected a factory and worker housing on ‘Knit Mill Hill’ near Shell Road, Beaufort. Local women were employed as workers in the mill; they operated machines which manufactured hosiery and knit goods. The Orion Knitting Mill closed in 1931, and was replaced by a tomato packing plant. In 1934, it again transitioned into Saunders Dry Cleaners.
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Record #:
35700
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Mingus Creek Mill offered a step back in time through visitors observing a miller operate its water powered mill, constructed during the early post-Colonial period. A souvenir for the visit included a bag containing two pounds of produce of the millers’ operation.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 3, May/June 1979, p28