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6 results for Mill villages
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Record #:
16894
Author(s):
Abstract:
Industrialization in North Carolina quickened in the 1880s, led by the textile industry. Textile mills sprang up in rural areas and towns, thereby leading to the development of mill villages. In this article, Eyre traces the broad outlines of how the functions and character of former mill villages have been altered by the widening economic influences of part of the Piedmont crescent.
Source:
North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 4 Issue , Winter 1995, p1-13, map, bibl, f
Subject(s):
Record #:
18937
Abstract:
Textile mills, long known for their influence on shaping the economy and landscape of North Carolina stand to continue their impact in the next century as preservationists are finding success in utilizing mill village structures for other purposes.
Source:
North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 110, Winter 1998, p6, f
Subject(s):
Record #:
28647
Author(s):
Abstract:
For many children of mill workers at the Loray Mill in Gastonia, summer was filled with memories of vacations at Camp Firestone on Lake James. Camp Firestone offered a vacation from the rigors of work at the mill, while allowing vacationers to be among the friends they lived with in the mill village and worked next to in the mill. The history of the mill-run vacation destination and its place in the lives of mill workers is told.
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Record #:
29156
Abstract:
In the height of textile production in the 1940s, company towns--towns within towns--housed thousands of workers and their families. For many of the children that grew up in Cone Mill Villages, White Oak, or Proximity Print Works, the experiences within these mill villages offer sweet memories.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 4, September 2017, p156-158, 160, por Periodical Website
Record #:
34945
Abstract:
In the mid-1900’s, mill villages became popular as a means to house and provide resources for families working at the textile mills. One mill village child, Judith Sams, recalls how the village she lived in, White Oak, became a self-sustaining town. White Oak ran on the mill schedule and created convenience stores and churches for everyone to attend.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 4, September 2017, p156-160, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
41160
Author(s):
Abstract:
Based upon a North Carolina Museum of History exhibit, this article examines how Lewis Hine’s expose of child labor exploitation in North Carolina’s textile mills contributed to stronger child labor laws. It also reveals that child labor is a current history issue, making whistleblowing initiatives of individuals like Hine still crucial.
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