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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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18 results for McGivney, Jen Tota
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Record #:
22779
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Huntersville is a town often identified with suburbia, but the town has much to offer for the nature enthusiast. The Torrence Creek Greenway, a quiet lake, and Cowan's Ford Wildlife Refuge are just a few of the ways visitors and residents can escape the busyness of Charlotte to simply enjoy the natural beauty of North Carolina.
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Record #:
24922
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The old Park Road Shopping Center in Charlotte is now under new ownership. Those who have been going there since it opened in 1956 are hoping it will keep its heart and character.
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Record #:
24953
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The Mecklenburg town of Matthews preserves a rich history in its business district. The local farmers market started 23 years ago and is now a booming business with a traditional feel. The nearby hardware store also maintains its original look and feel a sense of history.
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Record #:
24978
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Quidditch, a sport from the Harry Potter books, has taken off at UNC Charlotte. As a sport, it neutralizes gender, but is by no means easy to play. While the rules are a bit different in a non-magic, non-flying game outside the books, it is still a sport worth playing.
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Record #:
28595
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President Donald Trump’s travel ban has had an effect on the refugee community in Charlotte. A family of six from Homs in Syria fled the country but was stranded at the airport after the first travel ban went into effect. The Osama and his family eventually made it to Charlotte and they describe the anxiety and problems that came with the travel ban. Despite the problems, Osama is positive about the future and the opportunities he and his family will find in America.
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Record #:
31331
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The author follows the attempts of the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Animal Care and Control to decrease the rate of euthanization in their shelters. Where some counties have exhibited animal euthanization rates as high as 98%, program changes at CMACC have seen rates drop to 27%, one of the lowest in the nation.
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Record #:
31341
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The author examines advances in the treatment of lung cancer in the Charlotte area. Local cancer treatment is increasingly driven by an individualized approach, utilizing such treatments as gene therapy and immunotherapy
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Record #:
31435
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Near the intersection of Park and Woodlawn, a group of established neighborhoods with modest homes has suddenly become cool, creating a small-scale identity crisis that has residents wondering: What do we call ourselves?
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Record #:
31450
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The neighborhoods of Biddleville and Smallwood were once divided along racial lines. Now new and old residents are reinventing them together.
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Record #:
34427
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Dr. Marshall Silverman and Dr. Holly Smith of Signature Healthcare in SouthPark discuss the challenges of population growth outpacing the growth of primary care physicians. Concierge medicine arrived in Charlotte fifteen years ago with the opening of Signature Healthcare, creating an option for patients willing to pay a membership fee for an improved primary care experience. As healthcare and medicine continue to change, a new system for treating the wider population is needed.
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Record #:
34430
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Last year, about four-hundred refugees came to Charlotte, and approximately 17,000 have come here since the mid-1990s. Refugee Support Services, a non-profit organization, helps refugees build self-sufficiency skills and address medical, financial, employment, housing, children, legal and social services.
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Record #:
38185
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The linear park, initiated by the Mecklenburg County Greenway Master Plan, currently covers 47 miles of trails and wildlife habitat. Motives to stretch mileage to 95 miles by 2030 include younger workforce segments wanting connectivity and businesses wanting to build around the greenway. Incentives include a positive impact on individuals’ health and the metro’s economic health. Statistics attesting the impact already made include a 600% population growth since 1998 and 5.1 million square feet of office space planned or under construction in central Charlotte.
Record #:
38188
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The end credits for the last movie also marked the end of an era for a cinematic landmark in Charlotte. As for how Park Terrace Theatre became a landmark, it was for the usual reason people petition to save buildings that became community institutions. The building helped mark history through personal or collective memory.
Record #:
38203
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The shift from agrarian to urban, which started to occur over a century ago, is doubling back on itself in the growing number of people who are becoming farmers. As for today’s Davidson College students, many welcome spending as much time outside engaged in farm labor as inside listening to lectures. It’s a departure from the typical 19th century student’s reaction to the farm labor part of Davidson College’s curriculum: rebellion.
Record #:
38209
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Imagining the end of HIV includes the reality of overcoming challenges related to making the end possible. Challenges Charlotte-based organizations like RAIN address are accessing medications; the complicated treatment of HIV; Mecklenburg County’s HIV cases rate, among the highest in the nation.