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11 results for Animal rescue
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12405
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Not only did people lose homes and property during Hurricane Floyd, many were separated from their pets. Over 1,200 rescued animals were scattered in shelters around the state. Many never were reunited with their owners. In 2003, the State Animal Response Team (SART) partnered with other organizations to provide micro-chips to identify pets. To date, only 56,000 of the state's estimated 2.6 million companion animals have been equipped in this manner.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Autumn 2009, p10-12, il Periodical Website
Record #:
17080
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It wasn't until the late 1960s that the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals made a home in Raleigh, North Carolina. Thirty-three years later, the SPCA is taking another historic step: a $4.3 million fund raising campaign that is scheduled to yield a 17,000-square foot, state-of-the-art, pet adoption and education center in Raleigh.
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19290
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The Goathouse Rescue is a no-kill animal shelter in Chatham County. Recently the shelter was highlighted by a New York Times article and featured on the Today show to cheer on elderly owner Siglinda Scarpa as a heroine to abandoned animals, almost all cats. Volunteers are speaking out about the overpopulation of animals at the refuge and potential health risks to feline and human alike.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 30 Issue 12, March 2013, p19-21, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
23298
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In Martin County on their historic farm, the Ollmans take in horses with nowhere else to go.
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Record #:
29828
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Brother Wolf Animal Rescue is the largest no-kill animal rescue organization in North Carolina. Beyond rescuing animals and raising awareness, the organization runs an adoption center and offers crucial resources for pet owners. Euthanasia is used only on animals whose suffering is incurable or that are deemed dangerous and untreatable.
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29829
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Feline Urgent Rescue of Western North Carolina is a sanctuary in Waynesville where rescued cats can roam free until they are adopted. In another amazing story, Samantha Martin rescued a cat who became the inspiration behind the Amazing Acro-cats, a troupe of performing house cats.
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29830
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Mary Floyd started a nonprofit organization called, Mary Paws Adoptions, to house rescued cats at her homestead in Madison County, North Carolina. The nonprofit is also a ministry where cats in need are matched with people who will benefit from an animal’s companionship. Floyd is also working with the community to reduce the number of euthanized animals.
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Record #:
31331
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The author follows the attempts of the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Animal Care and Control to decrease the rate of euthanization in their shelters. Where some counties have exhibited animal euthanization rates as high as 98%, program changes at CMACC have seen rates drop to 27%, one of the lowest in the nation.
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Record #:
34386
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Kay Evans and her husband Jim established the Chocowinity Chicken Sanctuary and Education Center in 2007 after rescuing a chicken from the highway. They have rescued chickens from abuse cases, overturned transport trucks, illness, laboratories, and abandonment in both the commercial broiler and egg industries. Evans is committed to caring for as many birds as possible and to spreading the word about the feasibility of providing a home to a chicken.
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Record #:
34417
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This article highlights five exceptional dogs in Western North Carolina. These dogs are skilled in sniffing out drugs for the police department, racing through agility courses, modeling dog fashion, and guarding farms. Also highlighted are local dog parks, dog-friendly hotels, animal rescue and adoption centers.
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Record #:
34435
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Mac Tabby, Charlotte’s first cat café, is a coffee shop and cat adoption center owned by Lori Konawalik and her husband, Nick. They foster new kittens from local shelters, and so far, forty-five cats have already been adopted at the café. The café offers inclusive space for both its cat residents and human guests, featuring food, drinks, art and music.
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