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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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13 results for Health care industry
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Record #:
623
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From 1980 to 1990, the annual growth rate of health care products companies in North Carolina increased by 13.3% each year.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 2, Feb 1991, p48-51, il
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Record #:
16552
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A lingering global recession and concerns about the costs of healthcare reform have done little to show a continuing expansion of medical facilities across much of the Triangle and eastward to Greenville, Wilmington, and Hoke County. Projects worth close to $2 billion have produced new hospitals, hospital additions, emergency care units and specialty facilities across the region.
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Record #:
16591
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The debate between WakeMed and UNC Health Care has reached a fever pitch as the expansion of facilities in certain areas and the push for physicians is being called into question legally.
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Record #:
20035
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The health-care industry in North Carolina is experiencing changes brought about by factors including insurance reform, new technology, and an emphasis on prevention. Business North Carolina brought together a panel of experts from the health care field to discuss questions like How will factors like these impact health care in the state? How will they affect the state's economy? Will they affect how health care is managed? This article is a transcript of the discussion and has been edited for brevity and clarity.
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Record #:
23936
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To improve care, Carolinas HealthCare System asked Premier Inc., a Charlotte based company, to use and analyze data collected by the group. This article discusses the companies' relationship, Premier's history, and offers some criticism of Premier's strategies.
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Record #:
24160
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The author discusses the impacts of medial reform and Medicare on practitioners and the way primary care facilities are run today.
Record #:
24381
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The cost of health-care coverage is rising and many companies are foregoing group insurance policies, instead suggesting employees self-insure.
Record #:
25527
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Reforming how the state insures the health of its residents can save money and limit budget gaps, Gov. Pat McCrory and lawmakers say. But is North Carolina’s Medicaid program really in need of reform?
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Record #:
27360
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The cost of health care is rising due to practices of consumers and the way the health care system is setup. Several Triangle area medical experts weigh in on the problems with the health care system and its rising costs.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 9 Issue 31, July 31- Aug. 6 1991, p11-12 Periodical Website
Record #:
29178
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Despite pinching of a contracting economy, North Carolina's health product industry is growing and expanding. The value of products and the amount of them being produced in and shipped from North Carolina has rapidly grown in the last decade, sometimes quadrupling the numbers seen in 1980.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 2, Feb 1991, p48-51, por
Record #:
30185
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North Carolina health care providers are dealing with changes in population and procedures, the latter brought by the Patient Privacy and Affordable Care Act. They also manage growing rates of chronic diseases and face multiple challenges in providing care. A panel of health care experts examines these issues and prescribes solutions.
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Record #:
34427
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Dr. Marshall Silverman and Dr. Holly Smith of Signature Healthcare in SouthPark discuss the challenges of population growth outpacing the growth of primary care physicians. Concierge medicine arrived in Charlotte fifteen years ago with the opening of Signature Healthcare, creating an option for patients willing to pay a membership fee for an improved primary care experience. As healthcare and medicine continue to change, a new system for treating the wider population is needed.
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Record #:
35768
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According to the author, a nurse from Carteret General Hospital lived up to the saying “just what the doctor ordered” in her care.